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Prevalence of serological markers and risk factors for bloodborne pathogens in Salvador, Bahia state, Brazil

  • S. B. MATOS (a1), A. L. S. R. JESUS (a1), K. C. M. C. PEDROZA (a1), H. R. S. SODRE (a1), T. L. H. FERREIRA (a1) and F. W. M. LIMA (a1)...

Summary

This study aimed to determine the prevalence of serological markers for HIV-1/2, HBV, HCV, Treponema cruzi and T. pallidum infections. The association of these infections with risk factors in a population from Salvador, Bahia, Brazil was also analysed. Of the 780 enrolled individuals, 545 (70%) were female and 235 (30%) were male. Seroprevalence of 0·8% (6/702), 1·3% (9/678), 1·5% (10/684), 3·5% (23/663) and 11·5% (77/668) for HIV-1/2, HBV, HCV, T. cruzi and T. pallidum infections, respectively, was observed. The seroprevalence of T. pallidum was higher in males 20% (43/210) than in females 7% (34/458) (P < 0·01). An association between age and seroprevalence for T. cruzi (P = 0·02) and T. pallidum (P < 0·01) was observed. HBsAg was associated with having tattoos (3/37 vs. 6/623, P = 0·01) and not having a steady sexual partner (5/141 vs. 4/473, P = 0·04), while anti-HIV-1/2 was associated with having tattoos (2/39 vs. 4/647, P = 0·04); however, larger studies are needed to categorically state the relationship of these risk factors with infectious agents. The prevalence of serological markers for HIV-1/2, HBV, HCV and T. cruzi was consistent with other studies.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr F. W. M. Lima, Immunology Service of Infectious Diseases – ISID, Faculty of Pharmacy, Federal University of Bahia state, Rua Barão de Geremoabo, no. 147, Ondina, CEP 40170-115, Salvador, BA, Brazil. (Email: mlima@ufba.br)

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