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The prevalence of Campylobacter spp. in broiler flocks and on broiler carcases, and the risks associated with highly contaminated carcases

  • L. F. POWELL (a1), J. R. LAWES (a1), F. A. CLIFTON-HADLEY (a2), J. RODGERS (a2), K. HARRIS (a1), S. J. EVANS (a1) and A. VIDAL (a2)...

Summary

A baseline survey on the prevalence of Campylobacter spp. in broiler flocks and Campylobacter spp. on broiler carcases in the UK was performed in 2008 in accordance with Commission Decision 2007/516/EC. Pooled caecal contents from each randomly selected slaughter batch, and neck and breast skin from a single carcase were examined for Campylobacter spp. The prevalence of Campylobacter in the caeca of broiler batches was 75·8% (303/400) compared to 87·3% (349/400) on broiler carcases. Overall, 27·3% of the carcases were found to be highly contaminated with Campylobacter (⩾1000 c.f.u./g). Slaughter in the summer months (June, July, August) [odds ratio (OR) 3·50], previous partial depopulation of the flock (OR 3·37), and an increased mortality at 14 days (⩾1·25% to <1·75%) (OR 2·54) were identified as significant risk factors for the most heavily Campylobacter-contaminated carcases. Four poultry companies and farm location were also found to be significantly associated with highly contaminated carcases.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Mrs L. F. Powell, CERA, Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency, Woodham Lane, New Haw, Addlestone, Surrey KT15 3NB, UK. (Email: laura.powell@ahvla.gsi.gov.uk)

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Keywords

The prevalence of Campylobacter spp. in broiler flocks and on broiler carcases, and the risks associated with highly contaminated carcases

  • L. F. POWELL (a1), J. R. LAWES (a1), F. A. CLIFTON-HADLEY (a2), J. RODGERS (a2), K. HARRIS (a1), S. J. EVANS (a1) and A. VIDAL (a2)...

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