Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Prevalence of anti-hepatitis B surface antibodies among children and adolescents vaccinated in infancy and effect of booster dose administered within a pilot study

  • R. BASSAL (a1), M. P. MARKOVICH (a1) (a2), M. WEIL (a3), E. SHINAR (a4), Y. CARMELI (a5), M. DAN (a6), D. SOFER (a3), E. MENDELSON (a3) (a7), D. COHEN (a7) and T. SHOHAT (a1) (a7)...

Summary

We determined the prevalence of anti-hepatitis B surface antibodies (anti-HBs) among children and adolescents vaccinated for hepatitis B virus in infancy as part of the routine vaccination programme. A representative serum sample of the Israeli population age 0–19 was tested. In a separate pilot study, a booster dose of hepatitis B vaccine was administered to 31 candidates for national service, who were fully vaccinated in infancy and tested negative for hepatitis B surface antibodies at age 17–19 years and anti-HBs antibodies were assessed 8 weeks later. Of the 1273 samples tested, 631 (49·6%) were positive to anti-HBs antibodies. Seropositivity rates were 89·5% among infants aged 6–12 months and declined significantly with age to 20·7% at age 19 years. No differences in seropositivity rates were observed between Jews and Arabs, males and females and those born in Israel and in other countries. Seroconversion rate among the 31 individuals who received a booster dose was 90·3% (95% CI: 75·1–96·6%). We recommend a booster dose for healthcare personnel before starting to work at the health care facility.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Prevalence of anti-hepatitis B surface antibodies among children and adolescents vaccinated in infancy and effect of booster dose administered within a pilot study
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Prevalence of anti-hepatitis B surface antibodies among children and adolescents vaccinated in infancy and effect of booster dose administered within a pilot study
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Prevalence of anti-hepatitis B surface antibodies among children and adolescents vaccinated in infancy and effect of booster dose administered within a pilot study
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Ravit Bassal Ph.D. Head of the Laboratory Unit, Israel Center for Disease Control, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer 52621, Israel. (E-mail: ravit.bassal@moh.health.gov.il)

Footnotes

Hide All

These authors contributed equally to this work.

Footnotes

References

Hide All
1. Liang, TJ. Hepatitis B: the virus and disease. Hepatology 2009; 49: S13S21.
2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Hepatitis B in: Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases, The Pink Book. 13th edn. Atlanta, GA: US Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Foundation, 2015. Chapter 10. 149173. (https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/pinkbook/downloads/hepb.pdf). Accessed 5 March 2017.
3. World Health Organization (WHO). Media centre: hepatitis B. July 2016. (http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs204/en/). Accessed 5 March 2017.
4. Centers for Disease and Control (CDC). Hepatitis B FAQs for Health Professionals (http://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/hbv/hbvfaq.htm). Accessed 5 March 2017.
5. Lozano, R, et al. Global and regional mortality from 235 causes of death for 20 age groups in 1990 and 2010: a systematic analysis for the global burden of disease study 2010. Lancet 2012; 380: 20952128.
6. Tesher, D, Somekh, E. Hepatitis B vaccines and the immune response to them. Israeli Journal of Pediatrics 2010;73: 4.
7. Israeli Division of Epidemiology, Public Health Services Ministry of Health. Hepatitis B in: Vaccines Book. Updates: August 2016.
8. Hartal, M, et al. Seroprevalence of anti-HBs antibodies at young adulthood, before and after a booster vaccine dose, among medical personnel vaccinated in infancy. Vaccine 2015; 33: 48784885.
9. Gold, Y, et al. Decreased immune response to hepatitis B eight years after routine vaccination in Israel. Acta Paediatrica 2003; 92: 11581162.
10. Michaiel, R, et al. Vertical HBV transmission in Jerusalem in the vaccine era. Harefuah 2012; 151: 671674, 721, 722.
11. Joinpoint. Statistical Research and Applications Branch, National Cancer Institute. Joinpoint Regression Program, Version 4.4.0. (http://surveillance.cancer.gov/joinpoint). Accessed 5 January 2017.
12. Central Bureau of Statistics. Children immunized out of those registered in the mother and infant centers. Table 6.12 Published 10 Septemaber 2015.
13. World Health Organization (WHO). WHO vaccine-preventable diseases: monitoring system, Israel. Updated December 2016. (http://apps.who.int/immunization_monitoring/globalsummary/coverages?c=ISR). Accessed 5 March 2017.
14. Rots, NY, et al. Hepatitis B vaccination strategies tailored to different endemicity levels: some considerations. Vaccine 2010; 28: 893900.
15. El-Asheer, OM, et al. Immunogenicity of recombinant hepatitis B vaccine among routinely vaccinated healthy and chronically Ill children in Assiut, upper Egypt. Gastroenterology Research 2015; 8: 222227.
16. But, DY, et al. Twenty-two years follow-up of a prospective randomized trial of hepatitis B vaccines without booster dose in children: final report. Vaccine 2008; 26: 65876591.
17. Zanetti, AR, et al. Long-term immunogenicity of hepatitis B vaccination and policy for booster: an Italian multicentre study. Lancet 2005; 366: 13791384.
18. Norouzirad, R, et al. Serum levels of anti-hepatitis B surface antibody among vaccinated population aged 1 to 18 years in Ahvaz city southwest of Iran. Hepatitis Monthly 2014; 14: e13625.
19. El Mazahi, MM, et al. Long term immunity to hepatitis B vaccine among a sample of secondary school students in Damietta. Journal of American Science 2014; 10: 140145.
20. Chinchai, T, et al. Long-term humoral and cellular immune response to hepatitis B vaccine in high-risk children 18-20 years after neonatal immunization. Viral Immunology 2009; 22: 125130.
21. Saffar, H, et al. Prevalence of hepatitis B virus seromarkers in young adults vaccinated at birth; impact on the epidemiology of hepatitis B infection in Iran. Hepatitis Monthly 2014; 14: e17263.
22. Alfaleh, F, et al. Long-term protection of hepatitis B vaccine 18 years after vaccination. Journal of Infection 2008; 57: 404409.
23. Qawasmi, M, et al. Age-dependent decrease of anti-HBs titers and effect of booster doses using two different vaccines in Palestinian children vaccinated in early childhood. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics 2015; 11: 17171724.
24. Middleman, AB, et al. Duration of protection after infant hepatitis B vaccination series. Pediatrics 2014; 133: e1500e1507.
25. Spada, E, et al. Hepatitis B immunity in teenagers vaccinated as infants: an Italian 17-year follow-up study. Clinical Microbiology and Infection 2014; 20: O680O686.
26. Bagheri-Jamebozorgi, M, et al. The persistence of anti-HBs antibody and anamnestic response 20 years after primary vaccination with recombinant hepatitis B vaccine at infancy. Human Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics 2014; 10: 37313736.
27. Chaves, SS, et al. Persistence of long-term immunity to hepatitis B among adolescents immunized at birth. Vaccine 2012; 30: 16441649.
28. Lu, CY, et al. Waning immunity to plasma-derived hepatitis B vaccine and the need for boosters 15 years after neonatal vaccination. Hepatology 2004; 40: 14151420.
29. Israeli Ministry of Health. Director general's circular of 08/2016: vaccination of healthcare students and health system employees. September 2016. (http://www.health.gov.il/English/Topics/Vaccination/Pages/health_students_vaccines.aspx). Accessed 5 March 2017.

Keywords

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed