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Predominance of Clostridium difficile ribotypes 012, 027 and 046 in a university hospital in Chile, 2012

  • Á. PLAZA-GARRIDO (a1), J. BARRA-CARRASCO (a1), J. H. MACIAS (a2), R. CARMAN (a3), W. N. FAWLEY (a4), M. H. WILCOX (a4) (a5), C. HERNÁNDEZ-ROCHA (a6), A. M. GUZMÁN-DURÁN (a7), M. ALVAREZ-LOBOS (a6) and D. PAREDES-SABJA (a1)...

Summary

In a 1-year survey at a university hospital we found that 20·6% (81/392) of patients with antibiotic associated diarrohea where positive for C. difficile. The most common PCR ribotypes were 012 (14·8%), 027 (12·3%), 046 (12·3%) and 014/020 (9·9). The incidence rate was 2·6 cases of C. difficile infection for every 1000 outpatients.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr D. Paredes-Sabja, Gut Microbiota and Clostridia Research Group, Departamento de Ciencias Biológicas, Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Andrés Bello, República 217, Santiago, Chile. (Email: daniel.paredes.sabja@gmail.com) [D.P-S.] (Email: alvarezl@med.puc.cl) [M.A-L.]

References

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