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Phenotypic and genetic analyses of 111 clinical and environmental O1, O139, and non-O1/O139 Vibrio cholerae strains from different geographical areas

  • R. E. SELLEK (a1), M. NIEMCEWICZ (a2), J. S. OLSEN (a3), O. BASSY (a1) (a4), P. LORENZO (a1), L. MARTÍ (a1), A. ROSZKOWIAK (a2), J. KOCIK (a2) and J. C. CABRIA (a1)...

Summary

A total of 111 clinical and environmental O1, O139 and non-O1/O139 Vibrio cholerae strains isolated between 1978 and 2008 from different geographical areas were typed using a combination of methods: antibiotic susceptibility, biochemical test, serogroup, serotype, biotype, sequences containing variable numbers of tandem repeats (VNTRs) and virulence genes ctxA and tcpA amplification. As a result of the performed typing work, the strains were organized into four clusters: cluster A1 included clinical O1 Ogawa and O139 serogroup strains (ctxA + and tcpA +); cluster A2 included clinical non-O1/O139 strains (ctxA and tcpA ), as well as environmental O1 Inaba and non-O1/O139 strains (ctxA and tcpA /tcpA +); cluster B1 contained two clinical O1 strains and environmental non-O1/O139 strains (ctxA and tcpA +/tcpA ); cluster B2 contained clinical O1 Inaba and Ogawa strains (ctxA + and tcpA +). The results of this work illustrate the advantage of combining several typing methods to discriminate between clinical and environmental V. cholerae strains.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr R. E. Sellek, NBC and Materials Area, Instituto Tecnológico La Marañosa, Spanish Ministry of Defence, Ctra. San Martín de la Vega Km 10.5, 28330-San Martín de la Vega, Madrid, Spain. (Email: rselcan@oc.mde.es)

References

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Supplementary Fig. S1. The dendrogram was constructed based on phenotypic and genetic analysis of 111 V. cholerae strains (31 human origin, 75 environmental origin and five of unknown origin) using categorical coefficients and the UPGMA algorithm.

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Sellek Supplementary Table 1
Sellek Supplementary Table 1

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Sellek Supplementary Table 2
Supplementary Table S2. Calculation of the average value (in base pair) of the fragment sizes to normalize VC4, VC5 and VC9 alleles

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Phenotypic and genetic analyses of 111 clinical and environmental O1, O139, and non-O1/O139 Vibrio cholerae strains from different geographical areas

  • R. E. SELLEK (a1), M. NIEMCEWICZ (a2), J. S. OLSEN (a3), O. BASSY (a1) (a4), P. LORENZO (a1), L. MARTÍ (a1), A. ROSZKOWIAK (a2), J. KOCIK (a2) and J. C. CABRIA (a1)...

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