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Phage typing and PFGE pattern analysis as tools for epidemiological surveillance of Salmonella enterica serovar Bovismorbificans infections

  • A. LIESEGANG (a1), D. DAVOS (a2), J. C. BALZER (a1), W. RABSCH (a1), R. PRAGER (a1), D. LIGHTFOOT (a3), A. SIITONEN (a4), H. CLAUS (a5) and H. TSCHÄPE (a1)...

Abstract

Some years ago, an increase in the number of sporadic cases and outbreaks of salmonellosis due to S. enterica serovar Bovismorbificans was observed in several European countries including Finland, Sweden, England/Wales, Austria, and Germany. In order to understand the recent spread of this serovar and to trace the route of infection back to its source, it was considered necessary to subtype S. Bovismorbificans isolates. Using phage typing (newly described here) and molecular fingerprinting (PFGE-pattern, plasmid profiles and ribotype) the isolates of European origin could be subtyped and compared to S. Bovismorbificans isolates that originated in overseas countries such as Australia, Thailand, India, etc. where this serovar was isolated more frequently. Significant clonal diversity was identified but some of the clonal types of S. Bovismorbificans dominated the epidemics and single cases in Europe as well as in overseas countries. The clonal identity among these isolates indicates an international distribution, new sources of infection, and highlights the urgent requirement for standardized laboratory based surveillance networks (e.g. Enter-Net). Moreover, it is suggested that strains of S. Bovismorbificans will continue to be of concern in public health and that phage typing together with PFGE typing can be applied as reliable and rapid tools for their future monitoring.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence: Robert Koch-Institut, Bereich Wernigerode, Burgstr. 37 D-38855 Wernigerode, Germany.

Phage typing and PFGE pattern analysis as tools for epidemiological surveillance of Salmonella enterica serovar Bovismorbificans infections

  • A. LIESEGANG (a1), D. DAVOS (a2), J. C. BALZER (a1), W. RABSCH (a1), R. PRAGER (a1), D. LIGHTFOOT (a3), A. SIITONEN (a4), H. CLAUS (a5) and H. TSCHÄPE (a1)...

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