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Patterns of and hypotheses for infection-related cancers in a Chinese population with rapid economic development

  • R. Y. CHUNG (a1), G. M. LEUNG (a1), B. J. COWLING (a1) and C. M. SCHOOLING (a1)

Summary

With economic development, non-communicable diseases replace infectious diseases as the leading cause of death; how such transition occurs for infectious diseases with long latency has rarely been considered. We took advantage of a Chinese population with rapid economic development in the mid-20th century to study changing patterns of infection-related cancers. We used sex-specific Poisson regression to estimate age, period and cohort effects on adult deaths 1976–2005 from eight infection-related cancers in Hong Kong. Cervical, head and neck, and oesophageal cancers, associated with sexually transmitted infections, decreased for the first birth cohorts with sexual debut in a more developed environment. Leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, associated with vertically transmitted infections, decreased for the first cohorts born into a more developed environment. Birth cohort patterns were unclear for nasopharyngeal, stomach and liver cancers. Mortality rates for cancers related to early infections may depend on population history, with delayed reductions for some infection-related cancers.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr C. M. Schooling, School of Public Health, Unit 624-627, Level 6, Core F, Cyberport 3, 100 Cyberport Road, Hong Kong SAR, China. (Email: cms1@hkucc.hku.hk)

References

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