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Outbreak of Neisseria meningitidis C in workers at a large food-processing plant in Brazil: challenges of controlling disease spread to the larger community

  • B. P. M. ISER (a1), H. C. A. V. LIMA (a1), C. De MORAES (a1) (a2), R. P. A. De ALMEIDA (a3), L. T. WATANABE (a3), S. L. A. ALVES (a4), A. P. S. LEMOS (a5), M. C. O. GORLA (a5), M. G. GONÇALVES (a6), D. A. DOS SANTOS (a1) and J. SOBEL (a1) (a7)...

Summary

An outbreak of meningococcal disease (MD) with severe morbidity and mortality was investigated in midwestern Brazil in order to identify control measures. A MD case was defined as isolation of Neisseria meningitidis, or detection of polysaccharide antigen in a sterile site, or presence of clinical purpura fulminans, or an epidemiological link with a laboratory-confirmed case-patient, between June and August 2008. In 8 out of 16 MD cases studied, serogroup C ST103 complex was identified. Five (31%) cases had neurological findings and five (31%) died. The attack rate was 12 cases/100 000 town residents and 60 cases/100 000 employees in a large local food-processing plant. We conducted a matched case-control study of eight primary laboratory-confirmed cases (1:4). Factors associated with illness in single variable analysis were work at the processing plant [matched odds ratio (mOR) 22, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2·3–207·7, P<0·01], and residing <1 year in Rio Verde (mOR 7, 95% CI 1·11–43·9, P<0·02). Mass vaccination (>10 000 plant employees) stopped propagation in the plant, but not in the larger community.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Mrs B. P. M. Iser, Coordenação Geral de Doenças e Agravos não-transmissíveis – CGDANT, Secretaria de Vigilância em Saúde, Ministério da Saúde – SVS/MS, SAF Sul, Trechos 02 – Lotes 05/06 – Bloco F – Torre 1. Edificio Premium – Térreo, Sala 14, CEP 70070-600. (Email: betine.iser@saude.gov.br)

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Keywords

Outbreak of Neisseria meningitidis C in workers at a large food-processing plant in Brazil: challenges of controlling disease spread to the larger community

  • B. P. M. ISER (a1), H. C. A. V. LIMA (a1), C. De MORAES (a1) (a2), R. P. A. De ALMEIDA (a3), L. T. WATANABE (a3), S. L. A. ALVES (a4), A. P. S. LEMOS (a5), M. C. O. GORLA (a5), M. G. GONÇALVES (a6), D. A. DOS SANTOS (a1) and J. SOBEL (a1) (a7)...

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