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Outbreak of leptospirosis during a scout camp in the Luxembourg Belgian province, Belgium, summer 2012

  • M. MORI (a1), M. VAN ESBROECK (a2), S. DEPOORTER (a3), W. DECALUWE (a3), S. J. VANDECASTEELE (a3), D. FRETIN (a1) and M. REYNDERS (a3)...

Summary

An outbreak of leptospirosis occurred in the South of Belgium, during August 2012, in teenagers who participated in two consecutive adventure scout camps near the Semois river. Among the symptomatic patient population (ten scouts), clinical manifestations included headache (70%), myalgia (50%), fever (50%), bilateral conjunctival injection (50%), general malaise (30%), vomiting (20%), anorexia (20%) and cough (20%). Some of the cases presented elevated blood creatinine (40%), or proteinuria (30%). Three patients were confirmed by serology and one by polymerase chain reaction. Potential risk factors included direct contact with a muskrat and indirect contact with potentially contaminated environments including the river water. Prospective environmental investigation carried out near the river banks 2 weeks after the outbreak identified Ondatra zibethicus (muskrat) as one Leptospira sp. reservoir.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Author for correspondence: Dr M. Mori, Veterinary and Agrochemical Research Centre, CODA-CERVA, Brussels, Belgium. (Email: marcella.mori@coda-cerva.be)

References

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Outbreak of leptospirosis during a scout camp in the Luxembourg Belgian province, Belgium, summer 2012

  • M. MORI (a1), M. VAN ESBROECK (a2), S. DEPOORTER (a3), W. DECALUWE (a3), S. J. VANDECASTEELE (a3), D. FRETIN (a1) and M. REYNDERS (a3)...

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