Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Outbreak of Escherichia coli O157 Phage Type 32 linked to the consumption of venison products

  • A. Smith-Palmer (a1), G. Hawkins (a1), L. Browning (a1), L. Allison (a2), M. Hanson (a2), R. Bruce (a3), J. McElhiney (a3) and J. Horne (a3)...

Abstract

In September 2015, an outbreak of Escherichia coli Phage Type 32 with an indistinguishable multi locus variable number tandem repeat analysis profile was identified in Scotland. Twelve cases were identified; nine primary cases, two secondary and one asymptomatic case. Extensive food history investigations identified venison products containing wild venison produced by a single food business operator as the most likely source of the outbreak. Of the nine primary cases, eight had consumed venison products, and one case had not eaten venison themselves but had handled and cooked raw venison in the household. This was the first reported outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) linked to venison products in the UK, and was also notable due to the implicated products being commercially produced and widely distributed. In contrast, previous venison outbreaks reported from other countries have tended to be smaller and related to individually prepared carcases. The outbreak has highlighted some important knowledge gaps in relation to STEC in venison that are currently been investigated via a number of research studies.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Outbreak of Escherichia coli O157 Phage Type 32 linked to the consumption of venison products
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Outbreak of Escherichia coli O157 Phage Type 32 linked to the consumption of venison products
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Outbreak of Escherichia coli O157 Phage Type 32 linked to the consumption of venison products
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence: A. Smith-Palmer, E-mail: Alison.smith-palmer@nhs.net

References

Hide All
1.Browning, L et al. (2017) STEC in Scotland 2016: enhanced surveillance and reference laboratory data. HPS Weekly Report 51, 265273. Available at http://www.hps.scot.nhs.uk/documents/ewr/pdf2017/1732.pdf.
2.Tuttle, J et al. (1999) Lessons from a large outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 infections: insights into the infectious dose and method of widespread contamination of hamburger patties. Epidemiololgy and Infection 122, 185192.
3.Strachan, NJ et al. (2005) Dose response modelling of Escherichia coli O157 incorporating data from foodborne and environmental outbreaks. International Journal of Food Microbiology 103, 3547.
4.Beutin, L et al. (1993) Prevalence and some properties of verotoxin (Shiga-like toxin)-producing Escherichia coli in seven different species of healthy domestic animals. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 31, 24832488.
5.Caprioli, A et al. (2005) Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli: emerging issues on virulence and modes of transmission. Veterinary Research 36, 289311.
6.Rounds, JM et al. (2012) Non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli associated with venison. Emerging Infectious Diseases 18, 279282.
7.Heuvelink, AE et al. (2001) Zero-tolerance for faecal contamination of carcasses as a tool in the control of O157 VTEC infections. International Journal of Food Microbiology 66, 1320.
8.Bell, BP et al. (1994) A multistate outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7-associated bloody diarrhea and hemolytic uremic syndrome from hamburgers. The Washington experience. Journal of American Medical Association 272, 13491353.
9.King, LA et al. (2009) Community-wide outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 associated with consumption of frozen beef burgers. Epidemiology and Infection 137, 889896.
10.Trotz-Williams, LA et al. (2012) Pork implicated in a Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 outbreak in Ontario, Canada. Canadian Journal of Public Health 103, e322e326.
11.Sekse, C et al. (2009) An outbreak of Escherichia coli O103. International Journal of Food Microbiology 133, 259264.
12.Keene, WE et al. (1997) An outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 infections traced to jerky made from deer meat. Journal of the American Medical Association 277, 12291231.
13.Rabatsky-Ehr, T et al. (2002) Deer meat as the source for a sporadic case of Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection, Connecticut. Emergerging Infectious Diseases 8, 525527.
14.Health Protection Network (2013) Guidance for the Public Health Management of Infection with Verotoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC). Available at http://wwwdocumentshpsscotnhsuk/about-hps/hpn/vtecpdf.
15.Ahmed, R et al. (1987) Phage typing scheme for Escherichia coli O157:H7. Journal of Infectious diseases 155, 806809.
16.Holmes, A et al. (2014) Inter-laboratory comparison of multi-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) for verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli O157 to facilitate data sharing. Epidemiology and Infection 143, 14.
17.Jenkins, C et al. (2015) Public health investigation of two outbreaks of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157 associated with consumption of watercress. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 81, 39463952.
18.Public Health England, Food Standards Agency (2014) Results of the National Diet and Nutrition Survey (NDNS) rolling programme for 2008 and 2009 to 2011 and 2012. Available at http://wwwgovuk/government/statistics/national-diet-and-nutrition-survey-results-from-years-1-to-4-combined-of-the-rolling-programme-for-2008-and-2009-to-2011-and-2012.
19.Singh, P et al. (2015) Characterization of enteropathogenic and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in cattle and deer in a shared agroecosystem. Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology 5, 29.
20.Renter, DG et al. (2004) Escherichia coli O157:H7 in free-ranging deer in Nebraska. Journal of Wildlife Disease 37, 755760.
21.Dunn, JR et al. (2004) Prevalence of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in white-tailed deer from Louisiana. Journal of Wildlife Disease 40, 361365.
22.Fischer, JR et al. (2001) Experimental and field studies of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in white-tailed deer. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 67, 12181224.
23.Mora, A et al. (2012) Seropathotypes, phylogroups, Stx subtypes, and intimin types of wildlife-carried, Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli strains with the same characteristics as human-pathogenic isolates. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 78, 25782585.
24.Diaz-Sanchez, S et al. (2013) Prevalence of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp. and Campylobacter spp. in large game animals intended for consumption: relationship with management practices and livestock influence. Veterinary Microbiology 163, 274281.
25.Bardiau, M et al. (2010) Enteropathogenic (EPEC), enterohaemorrhagic (EHEC) and verotoxigenic (VTEC) Escherichia coli in wild cervids. Journal of Applied Microbiology 109, 22142222.
26.Asakura, H et al. (1998) Detection and genetical characterization of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli from wild deer. Microbiology and Immunology 42, 815822.
27.Obwegeser, T et al. (2012) Shedding of foodborne pathogens and microbial carcass contamination of hunted wild ruminants. Veterinary Microbiology 159, 149154.
28.Magwedere, K et al. (2013) Incidence of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli strains in beef, pork, chicken, deer, boar, bison, and rabbit retail meat. Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation 25, 254258.
29.Diaz-Sanchez, S et al. (2012) Detection and characterization of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in game meat and ready-to-eat meat products. International Journal of Food Microbiology 160, 179182.
30.Arthur, TM et al. (2013) Characterization of Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains isolated from supershedding cattle. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 79, 42944303.
31.Henry, MK et al. (2017) British Escherichia coli O157 in Cattle Study (BECS): to determine the prevalence of E. coli O157 in herds with cattle destined for the food chain. Epidemiology and Infection 145, 31683179.
32.Scottish Venison Partnership (2017) We will be importing even more venison in five years time predicts Scottish Venison Partnership. Available at http://wwwscottish-venisoninfo/indexphp?page=we-will-be-importing-even-more-venison-in-five-years-time.
33.Bures, D et al. (2015) Quality attributes and composition of meat from red deer (Cervus elaphus), fallow deer (Dama dama) and Aberdeen Angus and Holstein cattle (Bos taurus). Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 95, 22992306.

Keywords

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed