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The origin of urinary antibodies

  • G. R. E. Naylor and R. A. Caldwell

Extract

1. Antibodies to the flagellar antigens of salmonellae are frequently present in the urine of Egyptians.

2. In many individuals, who are not urinary carriers but have schistosomiasis and have received T.A.B. vaccine, these urinary antibodies are derived from the plasma due to exudation or bleeding into the urinary tract.

3. In urinary enteric carriers, the urinary antibodies are due, at least in part, to the local production or release of antibodies within the urinary tract, as shown by the ratios of urine titre to serum titre with different H suspensions.

4. The production of antibodies within the urinary tract is considered to be an example of production or liberation of antibody by cells at, or close to, the site of infection.

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References

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The origin of urinary antibodies

  • G. R. E. Naylor and R. A. Caldwell

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