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The occurrence of hepatitis B and C viruses in Pakistani patients with chronic liver disease and hepatocellula carcinoma

  • C. Y. W. Tong (a1), R. Khan (a1), N. J. Beeching (a2), W. U. Z. Tariq (a3), C. A. Hart (a1), N. Ahmad (a3) and I. A. Malik (a3)...

Summary

To study the occurrence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) in patients with chronic liver disease (CLD) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in Pakistan, blood samples from 105 sequential patients with biopsy-proven CLD (n = 82) and HCC (n = 23) were tested for HBV and HCV markers. Of the 105, 87 (83%) had evidence of hepatitis B exposure, 58 (55%) were positive for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), 23 (22%) had hepatitis C antibodies and 25 (24%) had detectable HCV RNA. Significantly more patients with HCC had evidence of HBV exposure in the absence of HCV markers (49/82 vs. 20/23, odds ratio 4·49,95 % CI 1·17–25·16). The proportion of patients positive for HBsAg with no HCV markers was also significantly higher in the HCC group (34/82 vs. 18/23, odds ratio 5·08, 95% CI 1·59—18·96). There were more patients with only HCV markers in the CLD group than the HCC group but the difference was not statistically significant (19/82 vs. 1/23, odds ratio 6·63, 95% CI 0·93—288·01). A modified non-isotopic restriction fragment length polymorphism study on PCR products was used to investigate the epidemiology of HCV genotypes in Pakistan. Due to depletion of the initial samples, a second series of specimens collected one year afterwards was used. Fifteen out of 40 samples had amplifiable product and all were identified as type 3. A commercial serological typing method on the same samples also confirmed that type 3 was the predominant HCV genotype in Pakistan.

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References

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