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Occurrence of co-infection with dengue viruses during 2014 in New Delhi, India

  • A. TAZEEN (a1), N. AFREEN (a1), M. ABDULLAH (a2), F. DEEBA (a1), S. H. HAIDER (a1), S. N. KAZIM (a1), S. ALI (a1), I. H. NAQVI (a3), S. BROOR (a4), A. AHMED (a5) and S. PARVEEN (a1)...

Summary

Dengue fever is an arthropod-borne viral infection that has become endemic in several parts of India including Delhi. We studied occurrence of co-infection with dengue viruses during an outbreak in New Delhi, India in 2014. For the present study, blood samples collected from symptomatic patients were analysed by RT–PCR. Eighty percent of the samples were positive for dengue virus. The result showed that DENV-1 (77%) was the predominant serotype followed by DENV-2 (60%). Concurrent infection with more than one serotype was identified in 43% of the positive samples. Phylogenetic analysis clustered DENV-1 strains with the American African and DENV-2 strains in Cosmopolitan genotypes. Four common amino-acid mutations were identified in the envelope gene of DENV-1 sequences (F337I, A369T, V380I and L402F) and one common mutation (N390S) in the DENV-2 sequences. Further analysis revealed purifying selection in both the serotypes. A significant number of patients were co-infected with DENV-1 and DENV-2 serotypes. Although we do not have direct evidence to demonstrate co-evolution of these two stereotypes, nonetheless their simultaneous occurrence does indicate that they are favoured by evolutionary forces. An ongoing surveillance and careful analysis of future outbreaks will strengthen the concept of co-evolution or otherwise. Whether the concurrent dengue viral infection is correlated with disease severity in a given population is another aspect to be pursued. This study is envisaged to be useful for future reference in the context of overall epidemiology.

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Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr S. Parveen, Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Basic Sciences, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi, India. (Email: sparveen2@jmi.ac.in; shamp25@yahoo.com)

References

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Occurrence of co-infection with dengue viruses during 2014 in New Delhi, India

  • A. TAZEEN (a1), N. AFREEN (a1), M. ABDULLAH (a2), F. DEEBA (a1), S. H. HAIDER (a1), S. N. KAZIM (a1), S. ALI (a1), I. H. NAQVI (a3), S. BROOR (a4), A. AHMED (a5) and S. PARVEEN (a1)...

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