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Network information analysis reveals risk perception transmission in a behaviour-influenza dynamics system

  • C.-M. LIAO (a1), S.-H. YOU (a1) and Y.-H. CHENG (a1)

Summary

Influenza poses a significant public health burden worldwide. Understanding how and to what extent people would change their behaviour in response to influenza outbreaks is critical for formulating public health policies. We incorporated the information-theoretic framework into a behaviour-influenza (BI) transmission dynamics system in order to understand the effects of individual behavioural change on influenza epidemics. We showed that information transmission of risk perception played a crucial role in the spread of health-seeking behaviour throughout influenza epidemics. Here a network BI model provides a new approach for understanding the risk perception spread and human behavioural change during disease outbreaks. Our study allows simultaneous consideration of epidemiological, psychological, and social factors as predictors of individual perception rates in behaviour-disease transmission systems. We suggest that a monitoring system with precise information on risk perception should be constructed to effectively promote health behaviours in preparation for emerging disease outbreaks.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Author for correspondence: Dr C.-M. Liao, Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan 10617, ROC. (Email: cmliao@ntu.edu.tw)

References

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