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Molecular diversity of Scottish Cryptosporidium hominis isolates

  • A. DESHPANDE (a1), C. L. ALEXANDER (a2), M. COYNE (a2), S. BROWNLIE (a3), A. SMITH-PALMER (a3) and B. L. JONES (a2)...

Summary

Cryptosporidium hominis is one of the most prevalent protozoan parasites to infect humans where transmission is via the consumption of infective oocysts. This study describes sporadic cases in addition to the molecular diversity of outbreak cases in Scotland using the glycoprotein-60 subtyping tool. From a total of 187 C. hominis isolates, 65 were subjected to further molecular analysis and 46 were found to be the common IbA10G2 subtype. Unusual subtypes included four isolates belonging to the Ia family (IaA14R3, n = 12; IaA14R2, n = 1; IaA9G3, n = 1; IaA25R3, n = 2), two from the Id family (IdA24, n = 1; IdA17, n = 1) and one belonging to the Ie family, namely IeA11G3T3. These data contribute significantly to our knowledge and understanding of the molecular diversity of C. hominis isolates from outbreak investigations involving Scottish residents which will be beneficial for the management of future outbreaks.

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Corresponding author

* Author for correspondence: Dr C. L. Alexander, Scottish Microbiology Reference Laboratories, Glasgow, Scottish Parasite Diagnostic and Reference Section, Level 5, New Lister Building, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Alexandra Parade, Glasgow G31 2ER, UK. (Email: Claire.Alexander@ggc.scot.nhs.uk)

References

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