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Molecular characterization and genotype shift of dengue virus strains between 2001 and 2014 in Guangzhou

  • L.Y. JIANG (a1), Q. L. JING (a1), Y. LIU (a1), Y. M. CAO (a1), W. Z. SU (a1), D. BIAO (a1) and Z. C. YANG (a1)...

Summary

We studied the evolution, genotypes, and the molecular clock of dengue virus serotype 1 (DENV-1), between 2001 and 2014 in Guangzhou, China. The analysis of the envelope (E) gene sequences of 67 DENV-1 strains isolated in Guangzhou, together with 58 representative sequences downloaded from NCBI, have shown shifts in viral genotypes. The genotype changed several times, from genotype I to IV in 2002, from IV to I in 2005, and from I to V in 2014. These genotype shifts may be the cause of DENV outbreaks. The diversity of genotypes and clades demonstrates a high risk of future outbreaks in Guangzhou. The mean rate of virus nucleotide substitution in Guangzhou was determined to be 7·77 × 10−4 per site per year, which represents a medium substitution rate compared to two other countries. Our research can point to different ancestors of the isolated strains, which may further reveal the different origins and transmission of DENV-1 strains in Guangzhou.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Professor Z. C. Yang, Guangzhou Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Baiyunqu Qidelu 1, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China. (Email: yangzc@gzcdc.org.cn)

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† These authors contributed equally to this work

Footnotes

References

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