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        A model-based evaluation of the national immunization programme against rubella infection and congenital rubella syndrome in The Netherlands
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        A model-based evaluation of the national immunization programme against rubella infection and congenital rubella syndrome in The Netherlands
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        A model-based evaluation of the national immunization programme against rubella infection and congenital rubella syndrome in The Netherlands
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Abstract

In order to improve the prevention of cases of congenital rubella syndrome in The Netherlands, in 1987 the selective vaccination strategy against rubella infection in girls was replaced by mass vaccination. This decision was supported by mathematical model analyses carried out by Van Druten and De Boo. In order to compare the predicted impact of the rubella vaccination programme with the current available data in more detail, a similar model was built. Although the model predicts elimination of the rubella virus, data show that virus circulation is still present at a higher level than expected by the model. Simulation studies indicate that import of infection and a lower vaccine effectiveness, related to possible asymptomatic reinfection of vaccinated people, could be sources contributing to the present virus circulation. Even though the number of infections is much higher than the number of reported cases of disease, limited serosurveillance data and case notification data show that females of childbearing age are well protected by immunization.