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Microsporidial infections due to Encephalitozoon intestinalis in non-HIV-infected patients with chronic diarrhoea

  • J. YAKOOB (a1), Z. ABBAS (a1), M. ASIM BEG (a2), W. JAFRI (a1), S. NAZ (a1), A. KHALID (a1) and R. KHAN (a1)...

Summary

We determined the prevalence of microsporidia Enterocytozoon (Ent.) bieneusi and Encephalitozoon (E.) intestinalis infection in patients with chronic diarrhoea and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A total of 330 stool samples were examined from 171 (52%) patients with chronic diarrhoea, 18 (5%) with HCC while 141 (43%) were controls. Stool microscopy, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with species-specific primers for Ent. bieneusi and E. intestinalis and sequencing were carried out. Microsporidia were found by trichrome staining in 11/330 (3%) and E. intestinalis by PCR in 13/330 (4%) while Ent. bieneusi was not detected. PCR for E. intestinalis was positive in 8/171 (5%) stool samples from patients with chronic diarrhoea, 2/141 (1·4%) samples from healthy controls and in 3/18 (17%) samples from patients with HCC. In the chronic diarrhoea group, E. intestinalis was positive in 4/171 (2·3%) (P=0·69) stool samples compared to 2/18 (11%) (P=0·06) in the HCC group and 2/141 (1·4%) from healthy controls. E. intestinalis infection was significantly associated with chronic diarrhoea and HCC in these patients who were negative for HIV. Stool examination with trichrome or species-specific PCR for microsporidia may help establish the cause of chronic diarrhoea.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr J. Yakoob, MBBS, PhD, FACP, Department of Medicine, Aga Khan University Hospital, Stadium Road, Karachi-74800, Pakistan. (Email: yakoobjaved@hotmail.com)

References

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Keywords

Microsporidial infections due to Encephalitozoon intestinalis in non-HIV-infected patients with chronic diarrhoea

  • J. YAKOOB (a1), Z. ABBAS (a1), M. ASIM BEG (a2), W. JAFRI (a1), S. NAZ (a1), A. KHALID (a1) and R. KHAN (a1)...

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