Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Meteorological factors and respiratory syncytial virus seasonality in subtropical Australia

  • C. Morley (a1), K. Grimwood (a1) (a2), S. Maloney (a3) and R. S. Ware (a2)

Abstract

Evidence is emerging regarding the influence of meteorological factors on seasonal respiratory syncytial virus outbreaks. Data however, are limited for subtropical regions, especially in the southern hemisphere. We examined whether meteorological data (daily minimum and maximum temperatures, rainfall, relative humidity, dew point, daily global solar exposure) and tourist numbers were associated with the incidence of RSV in children aged <5 years for the Gold Coast region of South-East Queensland, Australia (latitude 28.0°S). RSV cases between 1 July 2007 and 30 June 2016 were identified from the Pathology Queensland Gold Coast Laboratory database. Time-series methods were used to identify seasonal patterns. RSV activity peaked in mid-to-late autumn (April–May), tapering in winter (June–August). While most meteorological variables measured were associated with RSV incidence, rainfall (ρ = 0.40, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.32–0.48) and humidity (ρ = 0.38, 95% CI 0.29–0.46) 8 weeks earlier had the nearest temporal relationship. Tourist numbers were not correlated with RSV activity. Identifying meteorological conditions associated with seasonal RSV epidemics can improve understanding of virus transmission and assist planning for their impact upon the health sector, including timing of passive RSV immunoprophylaxis for high-risk infants and future public health interventions, such as maternal immunisation with RSV vaccines.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Meteorological factors and respiratory syncytial virus seasonality in subtropical Australia
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Meteorological factors and respiratory syncytial virus seasonality in subtropical Australia
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Meteorological factors and respiratory syncytial virus seasonality in subtropical Australia
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence: Carla Morley, E-mail: cmmorley1@gmail.com

References

Hide All
1.Shi, T, et al. (2017) Global, regional, and national disease burden estimates of acute lower respiratory infections due to respiratory syncytial virus in young children in 2015: a systematic review and modelling study. Lancet 390, 946958.
2.Murray, J, et al. (2014) Risk factors for hospital admission with RSV bronchiolitis in England: a population-based birth cohort study. PLoS ONE 9, e89186.
3.Reeves, RM, et al. (2016) Epidemiology of laboratory-confirmed respiratory syncytial virus infection in young children in England, 2010–2014: the importance of birth month. Epidemiology and Infection 144, 20492056.
4.Grimwood, K, et al. (2008) Risk factors for respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis hospital admission in New Zealand. Epidemiology and Infection 136, 13331341.
5.Ranmuthugala, G, Brown, L and Lidbury, BA (2011) Respiratory syncytial virus--the unrecognised cause of health and economic burden among young children in Australia. Communicable Disease Intelligence Quarterly Report 35, 177184.
6.Dede, A, et al. (2010) Respiratory syncytial virus infections in Central Australia. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 46, 3539.
7.Yusuf, S, et al. (2007) The relationship of meteorological conditions to the epidemic activity of respiratory syncytial virus. Epidemiology and Infection 135, 10771090.
8.Bloom-Feshbach, K, et al. (2013) Latitudinal variations in seasonal activity of influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV): a global comparative review. PLoS ONE 8, e54445.
9.Tang, JW and Loh, TP (2014) Correlations between climate factors and incidence—a contributor to RSV seasonality. Reviews in Medical Virology 24, 1534.
10.Vandini, S, et al. (2013) Respiratory syncytial virus infection in infants and correlation with meteorological factors and air pollutants. Italian Journal of Pediatrics 39, 1.
11.Paynter, S, et al. (2014) The importance of the local environment in the transmission of respiratory syncytial virus. Science of the Total Environment 493, 521525.
12.Paynter, S, et al. (2015) Respiratory syncytial virus seasonality in tropical Australia. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health 39, 810.
13.Lazzaro, T, Hogg, G and Barnett, P (2007) Respiratory syncytial virus infection and recurrent wheeze/asthma in children under five years: an epidemiological survey. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 43, 2933.
14.Hogan, AB, et al. (2016) Time series analysis of RSV and bronchiolitis seasonality in temperate and tropical Western Australia. Epidemics 16, 4955.
15.Fagan, P, McLeod, C and Baird, RW (2017) Seasonal variability of respiratory syncytial virus infection in the Top End of the Northern Territory (2012–2014). Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 53, 4346.
16.Treanor, J (2017) Respiratory infections. In: Richman, DD, Whitley, RJ, Hayden, FG (eds). Clinical Virology, 4th edn. Washington, DC: ASM Press, pp. 929.
17.Paynter, S (2015) Humidity and respiratory virus transmission in tropical and temperate settings. Epidemiology and Infection 143, 11101118.
18.Hambling, MH (1964) Survival of the respiratory syncytial virus during storage under various conditions. British Journal of Experimental Pathology 45, 647655.
19.American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases; American Academy of Pediatric Bronchiolitis Guidelines Committee (2014) Updated guidance for palivizumab prophylaxis among infants and young children at increased risk of hospitalization for respiratory syncytial virus infection. Pediatrics 134, 415420.
20.Gold Coast Public Health Unit. Gold Coast Population Health Report: Gold Coast Health. Available at http://www.healthygc.com.au/MedicareLocal/media/Site-Pages-Content/Plans%20Reports%20%26%20Resources/Gold-Coast-Population-Profile-2015.PDF (Accessed 16 August 2017).
21.Australian Bureau of Metereology. Climate Classification Maps. Available at http://www.bom.gov.au/jsp/ncc/climate_averages/climate-classifications/index.jsp?maptype=kpn#maps (Accessed 15 August 2017).
22.Jacoby, P, Glass, K and Moore, HC (2017) Characterizing the risk of respiratory syncytial virus in infants with older siblings: a population-based birth cohort study. Epidemiology and Infection 145, 266271.
23.Munywoki, PK, et al. (2015) Influence of age, severity of infection, and co-infection on the duration of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) shedding. Epidemiology and Infection 143, 804812.
24.Paynter, S, et al. (2014) Using mathematical transmission modelling to investigate drivers of respiratory syncytial virus seasonality in children in the Philippines. PLoS ONE 9, e90094.
25.Haynes, AK, et al. (2013) Respiratory syncytial virus circulation in seven countries with Global Disease Detection Regional Centers. The Journal of Infectious Diseases 208(Suppl. 3): S246S254.
26.Halstead, DC and Jenkins, SG (1998) Continuous non-seasonal epidemic of respiratory syncytial virus infection in the southeast United States. The Southern Medical Journal 91, 433436.
27.Sung, RY, et al. (1992) Epidemiology and aetiology of acute bronchiolitis in Hong Kong infants. Epidemiology and Infection 108, 147154.
28.Tang, JW, et al. (2010) Incidence of common respiratory viral infections related to climate factors in hospitalized children in Hong Kong. Epidemiology and Infection 138, 226235.
29.Hortal, M, et al. (1993) Meteorological variables and occurrence of respiratory syncytial virus in Uruguay. Research in Virology 144, 405408.
30.Straliotto, SM, et al. (2002) Viral etiology of acute respiratory infections among children in Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil. Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina Tropical 35, 283291.
31.Viegas, M, et al. (2004) Respiratory viruses seasonality in children under five years of age in Buenos Aires, Argentina: a five-year analysis. Journal of Infection 49, 222228.
32.Wang, TL, et al. (2005) Study on the relations between epidemiology of respiratory syncytial infection in children and climate factors in Hangzhou. Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue Za Zhi 26, 588591.
33.Paiva, TM, et al. (2012) Shift in the timing of respiratory syncytial virus circulation in a subtropical megalopolis: implications for immunoprophylaxis. Journal of Medical Virology 84, 18251830.
34.Ji, W, et al. (2011) Characteristics and the prevalence of respiratory viruses and the correlation with climatic factors of hospitalized children in Suzhou children's hospital. Zhonghua Yu Fang Yi Xue Za Zhi 45, 205210.
35.Welliver, RC Sr. (2007) Temperature, humidity, and ultraviolet B radiation predict community respiratory syncytial virus activity. Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal 26(Suppl. 11), S29S35.
36.Colosia, AD, et al. (2012) Residential crowding and severe respiratory syncytial virus disease among infants and young children: a systematic literature review. BMC Infectious Diseases 12, 95.
37.Matheson, JW, et al. (2006) Distinct patterns of evolution between respiratory syncytial virus subgroups A and B from New Zealand isolates collected over thirty-seven years. Journal of Medical Virology 78, 13541364.
38.Chiu, SN, et al. (2016) Risk of respiratory syncytial virus infection in cyanotic congenital heart disease in a subtropical area. Journal of Pediatrics 171, 2530 e21.
39.O'Grady, KF, et al. (2016) Prevalence, codetection and seasonal distribution of upper airway viruses and bacteria in children with acute respiratory illnesses with cough as a symptom. Clinical Microbiology and Infection 22, 527534.
40.Lim, FJ, et al. (2017) Using record linkage to examine testing patterns for respiratory viruses among children born in Western Australia. Epidemiology and Infection 145, 16881698.

Keywords

Type Description Title
WORD
Supplementary materials

Morley et al. supplementary material 1
Morley et al. supplementary material

 Word (75 KB)
75 KB

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed