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Large outbreaks of Clostridium perfringens food poisoning associated with the consumption of boiled salmon

  • J. H. Hewitt (a1), N. Begg (a2), J. Hewish (a3), S. Rawaf (a4), M. Stringer (a5) and Bernadette Theodore-Gandi (a6)...

Summary

Five large outbreaks of food poisoning are described in which clinical, epidemiological or laboratory data indicated Clostridium perfringens as the causative organism. The foodstuff common to all incidents was boiled salmon served cold as an hors d'oeuvre. In all cases the fish had been subject to a long period of cooling or storage between boiling and consumption. It is thought that multiplication of the organism occurred during this time.

Recommendations are made for the avoidance of further similar incidents.

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Copyright

References

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Bartholomew, B. A., Stringer, M. F., Watson, G. N. & Gilbert, R. J. (1985). Development and application of an ezyme linked immunosorbent assay for Clostridium perfringenstype A enterotoxin. Journal of Clinical Pathology 38, 222228.
Gilbert, R. J. (1983). Food-borne infections and intoxications; recent trends and prospects for tho future. In Food Microbiology: Advances and Prospects (cd.T. A. Roberta and F. A. Skinner), pp. 4766. Society for Applied Bacteriology Symposium Series No. 11. London and New York: Academic Press.
Roberts, D. (1982). Factors contributing to outbreaks of food-poisoning in England and Wales 1970–1979. Journal of Hygiene, Cambridge 89, 491498.
Taniguti, T. & Zenitani, B. (1969). Incidence of Chstridium perfringens in fishes. II. On the detection rate of C. perfringens type A and heat resistance of isolated strains. Journal of the Food Hygienic Society of Japan 10, 260271.
Turnbull, P. C. B. & Gilbert, R. J. (1982). Fish and shellfish poisoning in Britain. In Adverse Effects of Foods (ed. Jelliffe, E. F. P. and Jelliffe, D. B.), pp. 297306. New York: Plenum Press.

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