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Is vaccinating monkeys against yellow fever the ultimate solution for the Brazilian recurrent epizootics?

  • Eduardo Massad (a1) (a2) (a3), Mônica Manir Miguel (a1) and Francisco Antonio Bezerra Coutinho (a1)

Abstract

Vaccinating monkeys against yellow fever (YF) has been a common practice in the beginning of the 17D vaccine development. Although it may seem strange at first sight, vaccinating monkeys as a public health strategy is, we think, feasible and theoretically could eliminate the infection among non-human primates, interrupting the virus circulation (or significantly reducing it) and therefore reducing the risk of spilling over to the human population. We propose a series of studies that could demonstrate (or not) the efficacy and feasibility of vaccinating non-human primates YF reservoirs living in green areas of urban centres to cut off or curb the virus circulation that recurrently spill over to the human population. Therefore, vaccinating monkeys in relatively small green areas of the urban centres is perhaps the ultimate solution for the Brazilian recurrent YF epizootics.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence: Eduardo Massad, E-mail: edmassad@dim.fm.usp.br

References

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Keywords

Is vaccinating monkeys against yellow fever the ultimate solution for the Brazilian recurrent epizootics?

  • Eduardo Massad (a1) (a2) (a3), Mônica Manir Miguel (a1) and Francisco Antonio Bezerra Coutinho (a1)

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