Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Iron in Human Nutrition

  • E. M. Widdowson (a1) and R. A. McCance (a1)

Extract

An investigation has been made of the iron intake of sixty-three men and sixty-three women of the English middle class, living on freely chosen diets. Their intakes of total iron have been found to have mean values of 16·8 and 11·4 mg. per day respectively. The highest value found for any woman was only just above the average for the men, and 30 per cent, of the women were taking less than 10 mg. of iron a day.

“Available” or inorganic iron in the diets has also been calculated, and has been found to average 10·8 mg. per day for men and 7·9 mg. for women. If fairly large amounts of meat are eaten, the available iron may be less than half the total iron in the diet. If, on the other hand, the diet is mainly vegetarian, about 90 per cent, of the total iron may be available.

Haemoglobin determinations were made on more than 50 per cent, of the subjects. The men's average was 102 per cent, and the women's 93 per cent. No significant correlation could be found between the total or available iron intake and the haemoglobin level.

The effect of large doses of iron (100 mg. of iron a day as ferrous sulphate or ferric ammonium citrate) on normal haemoglobin levels has been investigated. This has scarcely altered the haemoglobin percentages of men, but has increased the values for women by 4–17 per cent, and a mean rise of over 10 per cent, has been observed.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Iron in Human Nutrition
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Iron in Human Nutrition
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Iron in Human Nutrition
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

References

Hide All
Cathcart, E. P. and Murray, A. M. T. (1931). Med. Res. Council, Special Report Series, No. 151.
Davidson, L. S. P., Fullerton, H. W. et al. (1933). Brit. Med. J. i, 685.
Elvehjem, C. A., Hart, E. B. and Sherman, W. C. (1933). J. Biol. Chem. 103, 61.
Farrar, G. E. and Goldhamer, S. M. (1935). J. Nutrition, 10, 241.
Gillett, L. H. (1918). Amer. J. Physiol. 47, 25.
Hawley, E. (1927). U.S. Dept. Agric. Tech. Bull. No. 8, Washington.
Hawley, E. (1929). U.S. Dept. Agric. Circular, No. 89.
Lintzel, W. (1929). Z.f. Biol. 89, 342 and 350.
McCance, R. A. and Shipp, H. L. (1933). Med. Res. Council, Special Report Series, No. 187.
Mccance, R. A., Widdowson, E. M. and Shackleton, L. R. B. (1936). Med. Res. Council, Special Report Series (in press).
McKay, H. (1929). Ohio Agric. Exp. Sta. Bull. No. 433.
Mitchell, H. (1935). J. Amer. Diet. Ass. 11, 28.
Ohlson, M. A. and Daum, K. (1935). J. Nutrition, 9, 75.
Orr, J. B. and Clark, M. L. (1930). Lancet, ii, 594.
Price-Jones, C. (1931). J. Path. and Bact. 34, 779.
Shackleton, L. R. B. and McCance, R. A. To be Published.
Sherman, H. C. (1907). U.S. Office of Expt. Sta. Bull. No. 185.
Sherman, H. C. (1933 a). Chemistry of Food and Nutrition, 4th ed.
Sherman, H. C. (1933 b). Food Products, 3rd ed.
Sherman, H. C., Elvehjem, C. A. and Hart, E. B. (1934). J. Biol. Chem. 107, 133.
Sherman, H. C. and Gillett, L. H. (1917). New York Assoc. for Improving the Condition of the Poor. Publ. 121.
Sherman, H. C., Mettler, A. J. and Sinclair, J. E. (1910). U.S. Dept. of Agric. Expt. Sta. Bull. No. 227.
Stockman, R. and Greig, E. D. W. (1897). J. Physiol. 21, 55.
Von Wendt, G. (1905). Skand. Archiv f. Physiol. 17, 211.
Widdowson, E. M. To be published.

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed