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Invasive pneumococcal disease in Victoria: a better measurement of the true incidence

  • H. J. CLOTHIER (a1) (a2), T. VU (a1), V. SUNDARARAJAN (a3), R. M. ANDREWS (a4), M. COUNAHAN (a1), G. F. TALLIS (a1) and S. B. LAMBERT (a2) (a5)...

Summary

Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) notifications are used to monitor IPD vaccination programmes. We conducted sequential deterministic data-linkage between IPD notifications and hospitalization data in Victoria, Australia, in order to determine whether all diagnosed cases were being reported. The proportion of each relevant hospital admission ICD-10-AM code that could be linked to notified cases was calculated. Total and age-specific annual rates were calculated and compared for notified and non-notified cases. Total incidence was estimated using data-linkage results and application of a two-source capture–recapture method. The first 2 years of IPD surveillance in Victoria missed at least one-sixth of laboratory-confirmed IPD cases. Estimated annual IPD rate increased from 9·0 to 10·7/100 000 and rose even higher, to 11·5/100 000, with age-specific rates possibly reaching 90·0/100 000 children aged <2 years, when using capture–recapture. Strategies to improve notification and coding of hospitalized cases of IPD are required.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Ms. H. J. Clothier, Epidemiology Unit, Victorian Infectious Diseases Reference Laboratory, 10 Wreckyn Street, North Melbourne 3051, Victoria, Australia. (Email: hazelclothier@optusnet.com.au)

References

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