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Interactive effects of age and respiratory virus on severe lower respiratory infection

  • N. Prasad (a1), A. A. Trenholme (a2), Q. S. Huang (a1), M. G. Thompson (a3), N. Pierse (a4), M. A. Widdowson (a3), T. Wood (a1), R. Seeds (a1), S. Taylor (a2), C.C. Grant (a5) (a6), E. C. Newbern (a1) and SHIVERS team (a1) (a2) (a3) (a4) (a5) (a6)...

Abstract

We investigated risk factors for severe acute lower respiratory infections (ALRI) among hospitalised children <2 years, with a focus on the interactions between virus and age. Statistical interactions between age and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), influenza, adenovirus (ADV) and rhinovirus on the risk of ALRI outcomes were investigated. Of 1780 hospitalisations, 228 (12.8%) were admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). The median (range) length of stay (LOS) in hospital was 3 (1–27) days. An increase of 1 month of age was associated with a decreased risk of ICU admission (rate ratio (RR) 0.94; 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.91–0.98) and with a decrease in LOS (RR 0.96; 95% CI 0.95–0.97). Associations between RSV, influenza, ADV positivity and ICU admission and LOS were significantly modified by age. Children <5 months old were at the highest risk from RSV-associated severe outcomes, while children >8 months were at greater risk from influenza-associated ICU admissions and long hospital stay. Children with ADV had increased LOS across all ages. In the first 2 years of life, the effects of different viruses on ALRI severity varies with age. Our findings help to identify specific ages that would most benefit from virus-specific interventions such as vaccines and antivirals.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence: N. Prasad, E-mail: Namrata.Prasad@esr.cri.nz

References

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