Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

The impact of environmental and behavioural cofactors on the development of cervical disorders in HR-HPV-infected women in Serbia

  • D. Tasic (a1), I. Lazarevic (a2), A. Knezevic (a2), L. Tasic (a1), A. Pikula (a1), Z. Perisic (a1), T. Jovanovic (a2) and M. Cupic (a2)...

Abstract

Persistent infection with one or more highly oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPVs) or high-risk-HPV (HR-HPV) is necessary but not a sufficient aetiological agent for the development of cervical neoplasia. A number of viral, host, environmental and behavioural factors are suggested to be associated with the progression of cervical disorder. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of environmental and behavioural cofactors on the development of cervical disorders in HR-HPV-infected women in Serbia. A total of 541 women have been tested by PCR for the presence of HPV on the cervix. HPV genotypes were determined by direct DNA sequencing. Women identified as HR-HPV-positive were further classified into four subgroups according to their cytological status. All relevant information about demographical and behavioural factors was obtained by interviewer-based questionnaire. A number of analytical and descriptive statistical methods were used for processing the data. The cofactors found to be of significance for the progression of cervical disease were older age, body mass index >25, lower educational level, long-term smoking, previous genital infections and cervical interventions. On the other hand, condom use was found to have a protective role. Information about these cofactors might be very important for the development of more efficient cancer prevention programmes and promotion of anti-HPV vaccination.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      The impact of environmental and behavioural cofactors on the development of cervical disorders in HR-HPV-infected women in Serbia
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      The impact of environmental and behavioural cofactors on the development of cervical disorders in HR-HPV-infected women in Serbia
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      The impact of environmental and behavioural cofactors on the development of cervical disorders in HR-HPV-infected women in Serbia
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence: D. Tasić, E-mail: dijanamicrogen@gmail.com

References

Hide All
1.Shwe, MM et al. (2014) Prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection among women with normal and abnormal cervical cytology in Myanmar. Acta Medica Okayama 68, 7987.
2.Bruni, L et al. (2015) ICO Information Centre on HPV and Cancer (HPV Information Centre) (https://www.hpvcentre.net) Human papillomavirus and related diseases in Europe. Summary Report 2015-12-23. [Data Accessed], Institut Català d’Oncologia, Barcelona, Spain.
3.Cancer Registry of Central Serbia (http://www.batut.org.rs) (2013) Cancer incidence and mortality in Central Serbia 2011, report number 13. Institute of Public Health of Serbia “Dr Milan Jovanovic Batut”, Belgrade, Serbia.
4.Cancer Registry of Central Serbia (http://www.batut.org.rs) (2017) Cancer incidence and mortality in Central Serbia 2015, report number 17. Institute of Public Health of Serbia “Dr Milan Jovanovic Batut”, Belgrade, Serbia.
5.Syrjänen, S et al. (2012) Oral HPV infection: current strategies for prevention and therapy. Current Pharmaceutical Design 18, 54525469.
6.Kim, J et al. (2012) Human papillomavirus genotypes and cofactors causing cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cervical cancer in Korean women. International Journal of Gynecological Cancer 22, 15701576.
7.Mai, S et al. (2015) Prognostic relevance of HPV infection and p16 overexpression in squamous cell anal cancer. International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics 93, 819827.
8.Castellsagué, X, Bosch, FX and Muňoz, N (2002) Environmental co-factors in HPV carcinogenesis. Virus Research 89, 191199.
9.Appleby, P et al. (2007) Cervical cancer and hormonal contraceptives: collaborative reanalysis of individual data for 16573 women with cervical cancer and 35509 women without cervical cancer from 24 epidemiological studies. The Lancet 10, 16091621.
10.Plummer, M et al. (2003) Smoking and cervical cancer: pooled analysis of the IARC multi-centric case-control study. Cancer Causes & Control 14, 805814.
11.Bosch, F et al. (2002) The causal relation between human papillomavirus and cervical cancer. Journal of Clinical Pathology 55, 244265.
12.Tao, L et al. (2014) Prevalence and risk factors for cervical neoplasia: a cervical cancer screening program in Beijing. BMC Public Health 14, 1185.
13.Capra, G et al. (2015) Analysis of persistence of human papillomavirus infection in men evaluated by sampling multiple genital sites. European Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences 19, 41534163.
14.Giuliano, AR et al. (2008) The human papillomavirus infection in men study: human papillomavirus prevalence and type distribution among men residing in Brazil, Mexico, and the United States. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention 17, 20362043.
15.Verteramo, R et al. (2009) Human papillomaviruses and genital co-infections in gynaecological outpatients. BMC Infectious Diseases 9, 16.
16.Gargano, JW et al. (2012) Age-group differences in human papillomavirus types and cofactors for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 3 among women referred to colposcopy. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention 21, 111121.
17.Prompakay, R et al. (2013) Relationship between the body mass index and abnormal Pap smears. Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention 14, 55035506.
18.Maruthur, NM et al. (2009) The association of obesity and cervical cancer screening: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Obesity (Silver Spring) 17, 375381.
19.Lee, JK et al. (2013) Mild obesity, physical activity, calorie intake, and the risks of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cervical cancer. PLoS ONE 8, e66555.
20.Capra, G et al. (2017) Potential impact of a nonavalent HPV vaccine on HPV related low-and high-grade cervical intraepithelial lesions: a referral hospital-based study in Sicily. Human Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics 8, 18391843.
21.Yang, DY and Bracken, K (2016) Update on the new 9-valent vaccine for human papillomavirus prevention. Canadian Family Physician 62, 399402.
22.Gravitt, PE et al. (2000) Improved amplification of genital human papillomaviruses. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 38, 357.
23.Azzimonti, B et al. (1999) Demonstration of multiple HPV types in laryngeal premalignant lesions using polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Journal of Medical Virology 59, 110116.
24.Forman, D et al. (2012) Global burden of human papillomavirus and related diseases. Vaccine 30S, F12F23.
25.Stamenkovic, M et al. (2016) High-risk human papilloma virus genotypes in cervical carcinoma of Serbian women: distribution and association with pathohistological findings. Biologicals 44, 412416.
26.Wong, HY, Loke, AY and Chan, NH (2011) Risk factors for cervical abnormalities among Hong Kong Chinese women: a large-scale community-based cervical screening program. Journal of Women's Health 20, 5359.
27.Louie, KS et al. (2009) Early age at first sexual intercourse and early pregnancy are risk factors for cervical cancer in developing countries. British Journal of Cancer 100, 11911197.
28.Shew, ML et al. (2006) Association of condom use, sexual behaviors, and sexually transmitted infections with the duration of genital human papillomavirus infection among adolescent women. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine 160, 151156.
29.Cornelis, JA et al. (2003) Condom use promotes regression of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and clearance of human papilloma virus: a randomized clinical trial. International Journal of Cancer 107, 811–810.
30.Castle, PE and Giuliano, AR (2003) Genital tract infections, cervical inflammation, and antioxidant nutrients – assessing their roles as human papillomavirus cofactors. Journal of National Cancer Institute Monographs 31, 2934.
31.Quinónez-Calvache, EM et al. (2016) Chlamydia trachomatis frequency in a cohort of HPV-infected Colombian women. PLoS ONE 11, e0147504.
32.Castellsagué, X and Muñoz, N (2003) Chapter 3: cofactors in human papillomavirus carcinogenesis – role of parity, oral contraceptives, and tobacco smoking. Journal of National Cancer Institute Monographs 31, 2028.
33.Hellberg, D et al. (1988) Smoking and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia: nicotine and cotinine in serum and cervical mucus in smokers and nonsmokers. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology 158, 910913.
34.Simen-Kapeu, A et al. (2008) Smoking impairs human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 and 18 capsids antibody response following natural HPV infection. Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases 40, 745751.
35.Vaccarella, S et al. (2008) Smoking and human papillomavirus infection: pooled analysis of the International Agency for Research on Cancer HPV Prevalence Surveys. International Journal of Epidemiology 37, 536546.
36.Sarian, LO et al. (2009) Increased risk of oncogenic human papillomavirus infections and incident high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia among smokers: experience from the Latin American screening study. Sexually Transmitted Diseases 36, 241248.
37.La Vecchia, C and Boccia, S (2014) Oral contraceptives, human papillomavirus and cervical cancer. European Journal of Cancer Prevention 23, 110112.

Keywords

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed