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Higher organism load associated with failure of azithromycin to treat rectal chlamydia

  • F. Y. S. KONG (a1), S. N. TABRIZI (a2) (a3), C. K. FAIRLEY (a4), S. PHILLIPS (a3), G. FEHLER (a4), M. LAW (a5), L. A. VODSTRCIL (a1) (a4), M. CHEN (a1) (a4), C. S. BRADSHAW (a1) (a4) and J. S. HOCKING (a1)...

Summary

Repeat rectal chlamydia infection is common in men who have sex with men (MSM) following treatment with 1 g azithromycin. This study describes the association between organism load and repeat rectal chlamydia infection, genovar distribution, and efficacy of azithromycin in asymptomatic MSM. Stored rectal chlamydia-positive samples from MSM were analysed for organism load and genotyped to assist differentiation between reinfection and treatment failure. Included men had follow-up tests within 100 days of index infection. Lymphogranuloma venereum and proctitis diagnosed symptomatically were excluded. Factors associated with repeat infection, treatment failure and reinfection were investigated. In total, 227 MSM were included – 64 with repeat infections [28·2%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 22·4–34·5]. Repeat positivity was associated with increased pre-treatment organism load [odds ratio (OR) 1·7, 95% CI 1·4–2·2]. Of 64 repeat infections, 29 (12·8%, 95% CI 8·7–17·8) were treatment failures and 35 (15·4%, 95% CI 11·0–20·8) were reinfections, 11 (17·2%, 95% CI 8·9–28·7) of which were definite reinfections. Treatment failure and reinfection were both associated with increased load (OR 2·0, 95% CI 1·4–2·7 and 1·6, 95% CI 1·2–2·2, respectively). The most prevalent genovars were G, D and J. Treatment efficacy for 1 g azithromycin was 83·6% (95% CI 77·2–88·8). Repeat positivity was associated with high pre-treatment organism load. Randomized controlled trials are urgently needed to evaluate azithromycin's efficacy and whether extended doses can overcome rectal infections with high organism load.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Mr F. Y. S. Kong, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Level 3, 207 Bouverie St, Melbourne, Australia 3004. (Email: kongf@unimelb.edu.au)

References

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