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The high frequency of non-aspartic acid residues at HA222 in influenza A(H1N1) 2009 pandemic viruses is associated with mortality during the upsurge of 2015: a molecular and epidemiological study from central India

  • P. V. BARDE (a1), M. SAHU (a1), M. K. SHUKLA (a1), P. K. BHARTI (a1), R. K. SHARMA (a1), L. K. SAHARE (a1), M. J. UKEY (a1) and N. SINGH (a1)...

Summary

Influenza A(H1N1) viruses of the 2009 pandemic (A(H1N1)pdm09) continue to cause outbreaks in the post-pandemic period. During January to May 2015, an upsurge of influenza was recorded that resulted in high fatality in central India. Genetic lineage, mutations in the hemagglutinin (HA) gene and infection by quasi-species are reported to affect disease severity. The objective of this study is to present the molecular and epidemiological trends during the 2015 influenza outbreak in central India. All the referred samples were subjected to qRT–PCR for diagnosis. HA gene sequencing (23 survivors and 24 non-survivors) and cloning were performed and analyzed using Molecular Evolutionary Genomic Analyzer (MEGA 5·05). Of the 3625 tested samples, 1607 (44·3%) were positive for influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, of which 228 (14·2%) individuals succumbed to death. A significant trend was observed in positivity (P = 0·003) and mortality (P < 0·0001) with increasing age. The circulating A(H1N1)pdm09 virus was characterized as belonging to clade-6B. Clinically significant mutations were detected. Patients infected with the quasi-species of the virus had a greater risk of death (P = 0·009). This study proposes a robust molecular and clinical surveillance program for the detection and characterization of the virus, along with prompt treatment protocols to prevent outbreaks.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr P. V. Barde, National Institute for Research in Tribal Health (NIRTH), Nagpur Road, Garha, Jabalpur 482003, India. (E-mail: pradip_barde@hotmail.com)

References

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The high frequency of non-aspartic acid residues at HA222 in influenza A(H1N1) 2009 pandemic viruses is associated with mortality during the upsurge of 2015: a molecular and epidemiological study from central India

  • P. V. BARDE (a1), M. SAHU (a1), M. K. SHUKLA (a1), P. K. BHARTI (a1), R. K. SHARMA (a1), L. K. SAHARE (a1), M. J. UKEY (a1) and N. SINGH (a1)...

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