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Force of infection of dengue serotypes in a population-based study in the northeast of Brazil

  • P. M. S. CASTANHA (a1), M. T. CORDEIRO (a2) (a3), C. M. T. MARTELLI (a4) (a5), W. V. SOUZA (a6), E. T. A. MARQUES (a2) (a7) and C. BRAGA (a1)...

Summary

This study investigated anti-dengue serotype-specific neutralizing antibodies in a random sample of dengue IgG-positive individuals identified in a survey performed in a hyperendemic setting in northeastern Brazil in 2005. Of 323 individuals, 174 (53·8%) had antibodies to dengue virus serotype 1 (DENV-1), 104 (32·2%) to DENV-2 and 301 (93·2%) to DENV-3. Monotypic infections by DENV-3 were the most frequent infection (35·6%). Of 109 individuals aged <15 years, 61·5% presented multitypic infections. The force of infection estimated by a catalytic model was 0·9%, 0·4% and 2·5% person-years for DENV-1, DENV-2 and DENV-3, respectively. By the age of 5 years, about 70%, 30% and 40% of participants were immune to DENV-3, DENV-2 and DENV-1, respectively. The data suggest that infection with DENV-1, -2 and -3 is intense at early ages, demonstrating the need for research efforts to investigate dengue infection in representative population samples of Brazilian children during early infancy.

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Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: P. M. S. Castanha, M.Sc., Centro de Pesquisas Aggeu Magalhães, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Avenida Professor Moraes Rego, s/n, Cidade Universitária, 50670-420, Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil. (Email: castanha.priscila@gmail.com)

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