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Foodborne outbreak of gastroenteritis due to Norovirus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus

  • M. R. SALA (a1), C. ARIAS (a1), A. DOMÍNGUEZ (a2) (a3), R. BARTOLOMÉ (a4) and J. M. MUNTADA (a5)...

Summary

Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Norovirus have been recognized as the cause of sporadic cases or outbreaks of diarrhoeal illness in association with the ingestion of raw or improperly cooked seafood. This report describes a foodborne outbreak of gastroenteritis caused by both Norovirus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus following the consumption of raw seafood in a restaurant in Terrassa (Catalonia, Spain) in September 2005. Measures are needed to reduce contamination of raw seafood. Consumers can reduce the risk of foodborne illness by avoiding consumption of raw or undercooked food.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dra. Maria Rosa Sala Farré, Epidemiological Surveillance Unit of the Central Region, Crta. de Torrebonica s/n, 08227 Terrassa, Barcerlona, Spain. (Email: rsala@sapcll.scs.es)

References

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Keywords

Foodborne outbreak of gastroenteritis due to Norovirus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus

  • M. R. SALA (a1), C. ARIAS (a1), A. DOMÍNGUEZ (a2) (a3), R. BARTOLOMÉ (a4) and J. M. MUNTADA (a5)...

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