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A foodborne norovirus outbreak in a nursing home and spread to staff and their household contacts

  • I. Parrón (a1), J. Álvarez (a1), M. Jané (a2) (a3), T. Cornejo Sánchez (a4), E. Razquin (a5), S. Guix (a6) (a7), G. Camps (a1), C. Pérez (a1), À. Domínguez (a3) (a8) and the Working Group for the Study of Outbreaks of Acute Gastroenteritis in Catalonia (a1) (a2) (a3) (a4) (a5) (a6) (a7) (a8)...

Abstract

On 16 March 2018, a nursing home notified a possible acute gastroenteritis outbreak that affected 11 people. Descriptive and case–control studies and analysis of clinical and environmental samples were carried out to determine the characteristics of the outbreak, its aetiology, the transmission mechanism and the causal food. The extent of the outbreak in and outside the nursing home was determined and the staff factors influencing propagation were studied by multivariate analysis. A turkey dinner on March 14 was associated with the outbreak (OR 4.22, 95% CI 1.11–16.01). Norovirus genogroups I and II were identified in stool samples. The attack rates in residents, staff and household contacts of staff were 23.49%, 46.22% and 22.87%, respectively. Care assistants and cleaning staff were the staff most frequently affected. Cohabitation with an affected care assistant was the most important factor in the occurrence of cases in the home (adjusted OR 6.37, 95% CI 1.13–36.02). Our results show that staff in close contact with residents and their household contacts had a higher risk of infection during the norovirus outbreak.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the same Creative Commons licence is included and the original work is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use.

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence: I. Parrón, E-mail: iparron@gencat.cat

Footnotes

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The Working Group for the Study of Outbreaks of Acute Gastroenteritis in Catalonia (PI16/02005) is composed of: Miquel Alsedà, Josep Álvarez, Irene Barrabeig, Isabel Belver, Neus Camps, Sofia Minguell, Monica Carol, Pere Godoy, Conchita Izquierdo, Mireia Jané, Ana Martínez, Ignacio Parrón, Cristina Pérez, Ariadna Rovira, Maria Sabaté, M Rosa Sala, Núria Torner, Rosa M Vileu (Agència de Salut Pública de Catalunya); Anna de Andrés, Javier de Benito, Esteve Camprubí, Montse Cunillé, M Lluïsa Forns, Antonio Moreno-Martínez, Efrén Razquín, Cristina Rius, Sara Sabaté, Mercé de Simón (Agència Salut Pública de Barcelona, CIBERESP); Rosa Bartolomé, Thais Cornejo (Hospital Vall d'Hebron); Susana Guix, Rosa M Pintó, Albert Bosch (Laboratori de Virus Entèrics, Universitat de Barcelona); Lorena Coronas, Àngela Domínguez, Núria Soldevila (Departament de Medicina, Universitat de Barcelona, CIBERESP).

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References

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