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Experiential learnings from the Nipah virus outbreaks in Kerala towards containment of infectious public health emergencies in India

  • Rima R. Sahay (a1), Pragya D. Yadav (a1), Nivedita Gupta (a2), Anita M. Shete (a1), Chandni Radhakrishnan (a3), Ganesh Mohan (a4), Nikhilesh Menon (a5), Tarun Bhatnagar (a6), Krishnasastry Suma (a7), Abhijeet V. Kadam (a8), P. T. Ullas (a1), B. Anu Kumar (a9), A. P. Sugunan (a9), V. K. Sreekala (a4), Rajan Khobragade (a10), Raman R. Gangakhedkar (a2) and Devendra T. Mourya (a1)...

Abstract

Nipah virus (NiV) outbreak occurred in Kozhikode district, Kerala, India in 2018 with a case fatality rate of 91% (21/23). In 2019, a single case with full recovery occurred in Ernakulam district. We described the response and control measures by the Indian Council of Medical Research and Kerala State Government for the 2019 NiV outbreak. The establishment of Point of Care assays and monoclonal antibodies administration facility for early diagnosis, response and treatment, intensified contact tracing activities, bio-risk management and hospital infection control training of healthcare workers contributed to effective control and containment of NiV outbreak in Ernakulam.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence: Pragya D. Yadav, E-mail: hellopragya22@gmail.com

References

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1.World Health, Organization (2018) Annual review of diseases prioritized under the Research and Development Blueprint. Informal consultation. Meeting Report. WHO; Geneva: Switzerland. Available at https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/2018prioritization-report.pdf?ua=1.
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5.Arunkumar, G et al. (2019) Outbreak investigation of Nipah virus disease in Kerala, India, 2018. Journal of Infectious Diseases 219, 18671868.
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Keywords

Experiential learnings from the Nipah virus outbreaks in Kerala towards containment of infectious public health emergencies in India

  • Rima R. Sahay (a1), Pragya D. Yadav (a1), Nivedita Gupta (a2), Anita M. Shete (a1), Chandni Radhakrishnan (a3), Ganesh Mohan (a4), Nikhilesh Menon (a5), Tarun Bhatnagar (a6), Krishnasastry Suma (a7), Abhijeet V. Kadam (a8), P. T. Ullas (a1), B. Anu Kumar (a9), A. P. Sugunan (a9), V. K. Sreekala (a4), Rajan Khobragade (a10), Raman R. Gangakhedkar (a2) and Devendra T. Mourya (a1)...

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