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Evolution of incidence and geographical distribution of Chagas disease in Mexico during a decade (2007–2016)

  • G. Ibáñez-Cervantes (a1) (a2), G. León-García (a2) (a3), G. Castro-Escarpulli (a4), J. Mancilla-Ramírez (a1) (a2), G. Victoria-Acosta (a5), M.A. Cureño-Díaz (a5), O. Sosa-Hernández (a5) and J.M. Bello-López (a5)...

Abstract

Chagas disease, whose aetiological agent is the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, mainly occurs in Latin America. In order to know the epidemiology and the geographical distribution of this disease in Mexico, the present work analyses the national surveillance data (10 years) for Chagas disease issued by the General Directorate of Epidemiology (GDE). An ecological analysis of Chagas disease (2007–2016) was performed in the annual reports issued by the GDE in Mexico. The cases and incidence were classified by year, state, age group, gender and seasons. A national distribution map showing Chagas disease incidence was generated. An increase of new cases was identified throughout the country (rates from 0.37 to 0.81 per 100 000 inhabitants). Of the total cases accumulated (7388), the major cases were attributed to the states of Veracruz, Chiapas, Quintana Roo, Oaxaca, Morelos and Yucatán. The analysis per age groups and gender revealed that, in most age groups, the incidence was higher in the male population. The most number of cases was identified in spring and summer; a direct relationship between the environmental temperature increase and the number of new cases was identified. The analysis showed that the rate of Chagas disease increased presumably due to state programmes; the search for new cases has expanded and we speculate that the disease is associated with occupational activities. These results summarise and recall how important it is to implement the monitoring of Chagas disease mainly in south states of the Mexican Republic in order to implement strategies to control this disease.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence: JM Bello–López, E-mail: juanmanuelbello81@hotmail.com

References

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Keywords

Evolution of incidence and geographical distribution of Chagas disease in Mexico during a decade (2007–2016)

  • G. Ibáñez-Cervantes (a1) (a2), G. León-García (a2) (a3), G. Castro-Escarpulli (a4), J. Mancilla-Ramírez (a1) (a2), G. Victoria-Acosta (a5), M.A. Cureño-Díaz (a5), O. Sosa-Hernández (a5) and J.M. Bello-López (a5)...

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