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Evidence of udder excretion of Campylobacter jejuni as the cause of milk-borne campylobacter outbreak

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 October 2009

D. N. Hutchinson
Affiliation:
Public Health Laboratory, Preston
F. J. Bolton
Affiliation:
Public Health Laboratory, Preston
P. M. Hinchliffe
Affiliation:
Public Health Laboratory, Preston
H. C. Dawkins
Affiliation:
Public Health Laboratory, Preston
S. D. Horsley
Affiliation:
South Cumbria Health Authority, Barrow-in-Furness
E. G. Jessop
Affiliation:
South Cumbria Health Authority, Barrow-in-Furness
P. A. Robertshaw
Affiliation:
South Lakeland District Council, Ulverston
D. E. Counter
Affiliation:
Veterinary Investigation Centre, Calthwaite, Penrith
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Summary

We describe a community outbreak of campylobacter enteritis associated with the consumption of untreated milk, apparently contaminated by two cows with campylobacter mastitis. The outbreak occurred in two phases. Strains of Campylobacter jejuni of the Penner serogroup complex 4, 13, 16, 50 and Preston biotype code 6100 were isolated from patients in both episodes and from the faeces of the cattle, milk filters, bulk milk and retail milk. Milk samples from two of 40 milking cows were found to contain C. jejuni, and the wheys from these two cows had high titres of antibody to C. jejuni detected by ELISA techniques.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1985

References

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