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Evaluating the impact of two training interventions to improve diagnosis and case-management of malaria and pneumonia in Uganda

  • D. M. SSEBULIBA (a1) (a2), R. OUIFKI (a2), C. PRETORIUS (a3), S. M. BURNETT (a4) (a5), M. K. MBONYE (a5) (a6), S. NAIKOBA (a5) (a6), K. WILLIS (a4) and M. R. WEAVER (a7)...

Summary

We present an age-structured mathematical model of malaria and pneumonia to study the effect of two capacity-building interventions: Integrated Management of Infectious Diseases (IMID) and On-site Support Services (OSS). IMID leads to a reduction in malaria prevalence by more than 2·4% across the [0,5), [5,14) and [14,50) age groups. IMID + OSS reduces it by more than 16·0% across all age groups. IMID decreases pneumonia prevalence by more than 3·0% across all age groups while IMID + OSS decreases it by more than 1·0% across all age groups. The number of malaria and pneumonia deaths is reduced by 7·8% by IMID across all age groups and IMID + OSS decreases this number by 30·5% across all age groups, which translates to saving a life of a child per month. Prevalence of malaria-pneumonia for the [0,5) age group is 0·52% at baseline, and IMID and IMID + OSS reduce it by 6·6% and 23·6%, respectively. There is no change in incidence of malaria or pneumonia disease episodes. The results also indicate that triaging of children contributes more than 50% to the effect of the interventions in reduction of deaths and a range of 14–91% in reduction of disease cases.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr D. M. Ssebuliba, International University of East Africa, Plot No. 1112/1121, Kasanga-Nabutiti, Ggaba Road, PO Box 35502, Kampala, Uganda. (Email: doreenresty@gmail.com)

References

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