Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Evaluating measles surveillance using laboratory-discarded notifications of measles-like illness during elimination

  • Y.-H. J. WANG (a1) (a2), R. M. ANDREWS (a3), H. KELLY (a4) and S. B. LAMBERT (a1) (a5)

Summary

For jurisdictions implementing measles elimination strategies, a minimum surveillance benchmark of 1/100 000 population per year measles-like illness (MLI) cases initially notified, but then rejected based on laboratory testing was proposed. We used this standard to assess the quality of the Victorian enhanced measles surveillance between 1998 and 2003. Victorian enhanced measles surveillance includes interviews with notified cases and confirmatory laboratory testing for notifications. We found 72% (918/1281) of measles notifications were discarded after testing. The median annual rate of discard was 2·9/100 000. The annual discard rate was inversely associated with the age of the notifications, and measles negative with no other diagnosis made was the most common laboratory outcome. The annual rates of discarded notifications in Victoria were consistently above the minimum recommended standard. The rate of discarded MLIs as a surveillance threshold should be useful in measles endemic regions, but may require modification where disease elimination has occurred.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Evaluating measles surveillance using laboratory-discarded notifications of measles-like illness during elimination
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Evaluating measles surveillance using laboratory-discarded notifications of measles-like illness during elimination
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Evaluating measles surveillance using laboratory-discarded notifications of measles-like illness during elimination
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr Y.-H. J. Wang, Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health Research, Macfarlane Burnet Institute for Medical Research and Public Health, GPO Box 2284, Melbourne, VIC 3001, Australia. (Email: julie@burnet.edu.au)

References

Hide All
1. The Enhanced Measles Surveillance Working Party. Implementing a system of enhanced surveillance for measles in Victoria. Communicable Diseases Intelligence 1999; 23: 51–4.
2. National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance. Childhood immunisation coverage-assessment date 30 June 2006 (http://www.ncirs.usyd.edu.au/research/r-acir-3rdquart.html). Accessed 11 January 2007.
3. Lambert, SB, et al. Enhanced measles surveillance during an interepidemic period in Victoria. Medical Journal of Australia 2000; 172: 114118.
4. Davidson, N, et al. A measles outbreak among young adults in Victoria, February 2001. Communicable Diseases Intelligence 2002; 26: 273278.
5. Lambert, SB, et al. Measles outbreak in young adults in Victoria, 1999. Medical Journal of Australia 2000; 173: 467471.
6. Chibo, D, et al. Molecular characterization of measles viruses isolated in Victoria, Australia, between 1973 and 1998. Journal of General Virology 2000; 81: 25112518.
7. World Health Organization – Western Pacific Regional Office. Progress towards national plans for measles elimination. Measles Bulletin 2006; 8: 1.
8. World Health Organization, United Nation's Children's Fund. Measles mortality reduction and regional elimination strategic plan 2001–2005. Geneva: World Health Organization, 2001; Report no.: WHO/V&B/01.13 Rev. 1.
9. de Quadros, CA, et al. Eradication of wild poliovirus from the Americas: acute flaccid paralysis surveillance, 1988–1995. Journal of Infectious Diseases 1997; 175 (Suppl. 1): S37S42.
10. World Health Organization. Poliomyelitis: recommended surveillance standards. Geneva, WHO, 2003.
11. Harpaz, R, Papania, MJ. Can a minimum rate of investigation of measleslike illnesses serve as a standard for evaluating measles surveillance? Journal of Infectious Diseases 2004; 189 (Suppl. 1): S204S209.
12. Australian Bureau of Statistics. Demography, Australia 2003. Canberra: Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2003.
13. Health (Infectious Diseases) Regulations 2001. S.R. No. 41/2001 (2001; amended 30 January 2004).
14. Communicable Diseases Network Australia. Interim surveillance case definitions for the Australian national notifiable diseases surveillance system. Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing, 2004 (version 1:43–44).
15. Guidelines for the control of measles outbreaks in Australia. Canberra: Commonwealth Department of Health and Aged Care, 2000 (Technical Report Series No. 5).
16. Australian Bureau of Statistics. 2001 Census of Population and Housing: selected social and housing characteristics, Australia. Canberra: Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2002, pp. 130.
17. World Health Organization. Module on best practices for measles surveillance. Geneva, WHO, 2001; Report no.: WHO/V&B/01.43.
18. Kelly, HA, et al. The age-specific prevalence of human parvovirus immunity in Victoria, Australia compared with other parts of the world. Epidemiology and Infection 2000; 124: 449457.
19. Yamanishi, K, et al. Identification of human herpesvirus-6 as a causal agent for exanthem subitum. Lancet 1988; i: 10651067.
20. Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation. The Australian Immunisation Handbook, 8th edn.Canberra: National Health and Medical Research Council, 2003, pp. 106113.
21. Turnbull, FM, et al. The Australian measles control campaign, 1998. Bulletin of the World Health Organisation 2001; 79: 882888.
22. Lambert, S. Measles in Victoria 1992 to 1996: the importance of laboratory confirmation. Communicable Diseases Intelligence 1998; 22: 1722.
23. World Health Organization – Western Pacific Regional Office. Global measles management meeting September 2006. Measles Bulletin 2006; 11: 24.
24. Andrews, R. Measles outbreak among young adults in Victoria. Communicable Diseases Intelligence 2001; 25: 12.
25. Riddell, MA, et al. Measles case imported from Europe to Victoria, Australia, March 2006. Eurosurveillance 2006; 11(5): E0605182.
26. Durrheim, DN, Speare, R, Ogunbanjo, GA. Elimation programs: monitoring the effectiveness of surveillance [Letter]. Journal of Infectious Diseases 2004; 190: 21952196.
27. Harpaz, R, Papania, MJ. Reply to Durrheim et al. [Letter]. Journal of Infectious Diseases 2004; 190: 21962197.

Evaluating measles surveillance using laboratory-discarded notifications of measles-like illness during elimination

  • Y.-H. J. WANG (a1) (a2), R. M. ANDREWS (a3), H. KELLY (a4) and S. B. LAMBERT (a1) (a5)

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed