Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Information:

  • Access
  • Cited by 9

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        The epidemiology of measles in Poland: prevalence of measles virus antibodies in the population
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        The epidemiology of measles in Poland: prevalence of measles virus antibodies in the population
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        The epidemiology of measles in Poland: prevalence of measles virus antibodies in the population
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

Abstract

WHO has adopted a goal of eliminating indigenous measles from the European Region by the year 2007. The strategy focuses on reducing the proportion of susceptible individuals in the population to low levels and maintaining these low levels of susceptibility. Routine vaccination against measles for children aged 13–15 months was introduced in Poland in 1975, and a second dose added in 1991. High coverage (> 95%) is achieved with both doses. In order to assess progress towards measles elimination in Poland, a serological survey was performed to evaluate the impact of vaccination on the susceptibility profile of population. Three thousand residual serum samples from individuals aged 1–30 years were collected from hospitals in six selected voivodeships (administration units) in Poland. These were tested for measles-specific IgG using a commercial ELISA. Overall 4% (120/3000) were negative for measles virus antibody. The highest proportion of negatives (8·2%) occurred among cohorts born 1977–81 – the only cohorts in which susceptibility exceeded the WHO targets. ‘Catch-up’ vaccination strategies should target these cohorts.