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Epidemiological profile and spectrum of neglected tropical disease eumycetoma from Delhi, North India

  • N. Dubey (a1), M. R. Capoor (a1), A. S. Hasan (a1), A. Gupta (a1), V. Ramesh (a2), S. Sharma (a3), A. Singh (a2), S. M. Rudramurthy (a4) and A. Chakrabarti (a4)...

Abstract

Mycetoma is a chronic granulomatous, suppurative and progressive inflammatory disease that usually involves the subcutaneous tissue and bones after traumatic inoculation of the causative organism. In India, actinomycotic mycetoma is prevalent in south India, south-east Rajasthan and Chandigarh, while eumycetoma, which constitutes one third of the total cases, is mainly reported from north India and central Rajasthan. The objective was to determine the epidemiological profile and spectrum of eumycetoma from a tertiary care hospital in Delhi, North India. Thirty cases of eumycetoma were diagnosed by conventional methods of direct microscopy, culture and species-specific sequencing as per standard protocol. The spectrum of fungal pathogens included Exophiala jeanselmei, Madurella mycetomatis, Fusarium solani, Sarocladium kiliense, Acremonium blochii, Aspergillus nidulans, Fusarium incarnatum, Scedosporium apiospermum complex, Curvularia lunata and Medicopsis romeroi. Eumycetoma can be treated with antifungal therapy and needs to be combined with surgery. It has good prognosis if it is timely diagnosed and the correct species identified by culture for targeted therapy of these patients. Black moulds required prolonged therapy. Its low reporting and lack of familiarity may predispose patients to misdiagnosis and consequently delayed treatment. Hence health education and awareness campaign on the national and international level in the mycetoma belt is crucial.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence: M. R. Capoor, E-mail: malinircapoor@gmail.com

References

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Keywords

Epidemiological profile and spectrum of neglected tropical disease eumycetoma from Delhi, North India

  • N. Dubey (a1), M. R. Capoor (a1), A. S. Hasan (a1), A. Gupta (a1), V. Ramesh (a2), S. Sharma (a3), A. Singh (a2), S. M. Rudramurthy (a4) and A. Chakrabarti (a4)...

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