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Epidemiological and clinical features of HEV infection: a survey in the district of Foggia (Apulia, Southern Italy)

  • G. SCOTTO (a1), D. MARTINELLI (a2), M. CENTRA (a3), M. QUERQUES (a4), F. VITTORIO (a3), P. DELLI CARRI (a4), A. TARTAGLIA (a1), F. CAMPANALE (a1), F. BULLA (a1), R. PRATO (a2) and V. FAZIO (a5)...

Summary

In this study we assessed the seroprevalence of hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection in both the Italian population and immigrants from developing countries in Foggia (Apulia, Southern Italy). The seroprevalence of HEV was determined in 1217 subjects [412 (34%) immigrants and 805 Italian subjects (blood donors, general population, HIV-positive, haemodialysis patients)]. Serum samples were tested for anti-HEV and confirmed by Western blot assay; in positive patients HEV RNA and genotype were also determined. There were 8·8% of patients that were positive to anti-HEV, confirmed by Western blot. The prevalence in immigrants was 19·7%, and in Italians 3·9% (blood donors 1·3%, general population 2·7%, HIV-positive patients 2·0%, haemodialysis patients 9·6%). Anti-HEV IgM was found in 38/107 (35·5%) of the anti-HEV-positive serum samples (34 immigrants, four Italians). This study indicates a higher circulation of HEV in immigrants and Italian haemodialysis patients, whereas a low prevalence of HEV antibodies was seen in the remaining Italian population.

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Corresponding author

* Author for correspondence: Dr G. Scotto, Clinic of Infectious diseases, University of Foggia, Viale Pinto 1, 71100 Foggia Italy. (Email: gaescot@gmail.com)

References

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Keywords

Epidemiological and clinical features of HEV infection: a survey in the district of Foggia (Apulia, Southern Italy)

  • G. SCOTTO (a1), D. MARTINELLI (a2), M. CENTRA (a3), M. QUERQUES (a4), F. VITTORIO (a3), P. DELLI CARRI (a4), A. TARTAGLIA (a1), F. CAMPANALE (a1), F. BULLA (a1), R. PRATO (a2) and V. FAZIO (a5)...

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