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Environmental characteristics associated with campylobacteriosis: accounting for the effect of age and season

  • J. ARSENAULT (a1) (a2), P. MICHEL (a2) (a3), O. BERKE (a4), A. RAVEL (a2) (a3) and P. GOSSELIN (a2) (a5)...

Summary

Campylobacteriosis is a leading cause of acute bacterial gastroenteritis. An ecological study was undertaken to explore the association between environmental characteristics and incidence of campylobacteriosis in relation to four age groups and two seasonal periods. A multi-level Poisson regression model was used for modelling at the municipal level. High ruminant density was positively associated with incidence of campylobacteriosis, with a reduced effect as people become older. High poultry density and presence of a large poultry slaughterhouse were also associated with higher incidence, but only for people aged 16–34 years. The effect of ruminant density, poultry density, and slaughterhouses were constant across seasonal periods. Other associations were detected with population density and average daily precipitation. Close contacts with farm animals are probably involved in the associations observed. The specificity of age and season on this important disease must be considered in further studies and in the design of preventive measures.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: J. Arsenault, D.V.M., M.Sc., Ph.D., University of Montreal, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Pathology and Microbiology, 3200 Sicotte, Saint-Hyacinthe, Québec, J2S 7C6, Canada. (Email: Julie.arsenault@umontreal.ca)

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Keywords

Environmental characteristics associated with campylobacteriosis: accounting for the effect of age and season

  • J. ARSENAULT (a1) (a2), P. MICHEL (a2) (a3), O. BERKE (a4), A. RAVEL (a2) (a3) and P. GOSSELIN (a2) (a5)...

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