Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Emerging of ptxP3 lineage in Bordetella pertussis strains circulating in a population in northeastern Mexico

  • J. L. Gutiérrez-Ferman (a1), L. Villarreal-Treviño (a2), J. M. Ramírez-Aranda (a3), A. Camacho-Ortiz (a4), M. R. Ballesteros-Elizondo (a5), M. R. Moreno-Juárez (a5), S. Mendoza-Olazarán (a1), M. E. de la O Cavazos (a5), J. Z. Villarreal-Pérez (a6), M. A. Gómez-Govea (a2) and E. Garza-González (a1)...

Abstract

We determined the molecular epidemiology of Bordetella pertussis isolates to evaluate its potential impact on pertussis reemergence in a population of Mexico. Symptomatic and asymptomatic cases were included. Pertussis infection was confirmed by culture and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Selected B. pertussis isolates were further analysed; i.e. clonality was analysed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and ptxP-ptxA, prn, fim2 and fim3 typing was performed by PCR and sequencing. Out of 11 864 analysed samples, 687 (5.8%) were positive for pertussis, with 244 (36%) confirmed by both culture and PCR whereas 115 (17%) were positive only by culture and 328 (48%) were positive only by PCR. One predominant clone (clone A, n = 62/113; 55%) and three major subtypes (A1, A2 and A3) were identified by PFGE. All 113 selected isolates had the allelic combination ptxP3-ptxA1. The predominant clone A and the three major subtypes (A1, A2 and A3) corresponded to the emerging genotypes ptxP3-ptxA1-prn2-fim2-1-fim3-2 and ptxP3-ptxA1-prn2-fim2-1-fim3-1. In conclusion, the presence of an endemic clone and three predominant subtypes belonging to the genotypes ptxP3-ptxA1-prn2-fim2-1-fim3-2 and ptxP3-ptxA1-prn2-fim2-1-fim3-1 were detected. This finding supports the global spread/expansion reported for these outbreaks associated genotypes.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Emerging of ptxP3 lineage in Bordetella pertussis strains circulating in a population in northeastern Mexico
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Emerging of ptxP3 lineage in Bordetella pertussis strains circulating in a population in northeastern Mexico
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Emerging of ptxP3 lineage in Bordetella pertussis strains circulating in a population in northeastern Mexico
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence: E. Garza-González, E-mail: elvira_garza_gzz@yahoo.com

References

Hide All
1.Carbonetti, NH (2016) Bordetella pertussis: new concepts in pathogenesis and treatment. Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases 29, 287294.
2.Sato, Y, Kimura, M and Fukumi, H (1984) Development of a pertussis component vaccine in Japan. Lancet 1, 122126.
3.Perez-Perez, GF et al. (2015) Pertussis in Mexico, an epidemiological overview. A study of 19 years at the Institute Mexicano del Seguro Social. Revista medica del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social 52, 164170.
4.World Health Organization. Immunization schedules by diseases. Available at http://apps.who.int/immunization_monitoring/globalsummary/diseases (Accessed 27 February 2018).
5.Manual de vacunación 2008–2009. Available at http://saludchiapas.gob.mx/doc/biblioteca_virtual/manuales_modelos/Manual_Vacunacion_2008_2009.pdf (Accessed 27 February 2018).
6.Cofepris. Comisión de autorización sanitaria. Available at http://www.cofepris.gob.mx/AS/Documents/RegistroSanitarioMedicamentos/Vacunas/Vacunas.pdf (Accessed 27 February 2018).
7.Cofepris. Vacuna absorbida antidiftérica, antitetánica y contra la tosferina. Available at http://www.cofepris.gob.mx/AS/Documents/RegistroSanitarioMedicamentos/Vacunas/085m2003.pdf (Accessed 27 February 2018).
8.Mooi, FR, Van Der Maas, NA and De Melker, HE (2014) Pertussis resurgence: waning immunity and pathogen adaptation - two sides of the same coin. Epidemiology and Infection 142, 685694.
9.Warfel, JM, Zimmerman, LI and Merkel, TJ (2014) Acellular pertussis vaccines protect against disease but fail to prevent infection and transmission in a nonhuman primate model. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 111, 787792.
10.Mooi, FR et al. (2009) Bordetella pertussis strains with increased toxin production associated with pertussis resurgence. Emerging Infectious Diseases 15, 12061213.
11.Bailon, H et al. (2016) Increase in pertussis cases along with high prevalence of two emerging genotypes of Bordetella pertussis in Peru, 2012. BMC Infectious Diseases 16, 422.
12.Clarke, M et al. (2016) The relationship between Bordetella pertussis genotype and clinical severity in Australian children with pertussis. The Journal of Infection 72, 171178.
13.Bouchez, V et al. (2015) New data on vaccine antigen deficient Bordetella pertussis isolates. Vaccines 3, 751770.
14.Campbell, P et al. (2012) Increased population prevalence of low pertussis toxin antibody levels in young children preceding a record pertussis epidemic in Australia. PLoS ONE 7, e35874.
15.Witt, MA, Katz, PH and Witt, DJ (2012) Unexpectedly limited durability of immunity following acellular pertussis vaccination in preadolescents in a North American outbreak. Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 54, 17301735.
16.Miyaji, Y et al. (2013) Genetic analysis of Bordetella pertussis isolates from the 2008–2010 pertussis epidemic in Japan. PLoS ONE 8, e77165.
17.Fathima, S et al. (2014) Bordetella pertussis in sporadic and outbreak settings in Alberta, Canada, July 2004-December 2012. BMC Infectious Diseases 14, 48.
18.Rocha, EL et al. (2017) The characterization of Bordetella pertussis strains isolated in the Central-Western region of Brazil suggests the selection of a specific genetic profile during 2012–2014 outbreaks. Epidemiology and Infection 145, 13921397.
19.Dirección General de Epidemiología (DGE). Anuario de morbilidad 1984–2016. Available at http://www.epidemiologia.salud.gob.mx/anuario/html/incidencia_enfermedad.html (Accessed 27 February 2018).
20.Centros para el control y la prevención de enfermedades. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/pertussis/countries/lapp-mexico-sp.html (Accessed 27 February 2018).
21.Tatti, KM et al. (2011) Novel multitarget real-time PCR assay for rapid detection of Bordetella species in clinical specimens. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 49, 40594066.
22.Bisgard, KM et al. (2001) Molecular epidemiology of Bordetella pertussis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profile: Cincinnati, 1989–1996. The Journal of Infectious Diseases 183, 13601367.
23.Tenover, FC et al. (1995) Interpreting chromosomal DNA restriction patterns produced by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis: criteria for bacterial strain typing. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 33, 22332239.
24.Schmidtke, AJ et al. (2012) Population diversity among Bordetella pertussis isolates, United States, 1935–2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases 18, 12481255.
25.Borisova, O et al. (2007) Antigenic divergence between Bordetella pertussis clinical isolates from Moscow, Russia, and vaccine strains. Clinical and Vaccine Immunology: CVI 14, 234238.
26.King, AJ et al. (2013) Genome-wide gene expression analysis of Bordetella pertussis isolates associated with a resurgence in pertussis: elucidation of factors involved in the increased fitness of epidemic strains. PLoS ONE 8, e66150.
27.Kurniawan, J et al. (2010) Bordetella pertussis clones identified by multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis. Emerging Infectious Diseases 16, 297300.
28.Lam, C et al. (2014) Rapid increase in pertactin-deficient Bordetella pertussis isolates, Australia. Emerging Infectious Diseases 20, 626633.
29.Pawloski, LC et al. (2014) Prevalence and molecular characterization of pertactin-deficient Bordetella pertussis in the United States. Clinical and Vaccine Immunology: CVI 21, 119125.
30.Safarchi, A et al. (2016) Genomic dissection of Australian Bordetella pertussis isolates from the 2008–2012 epidemic. The Journal of Infection 72, 468477.
31.Conde-Glez, C et al. (2014) Seroprevalence of Bordetella pertussis in the Mexican population: a cross-sectional study. Epidemiology and Infection 142, 706713.
32.Bisgard, KM et al. (2004) Infant pertussis: who was the source? The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal 23, 985989.
33.de Greeff, SC et al. (2010) Pertussis disease burden in the household: how to protect young infants. Clinical Infectious Diseases: an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 50, 13391345.
34.Wendelboe, AM et al. (2007) Transmission of Bordetella pertussis to young infants. The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal 26, 293299.
35.Tatti, KM et al. (2008) Development and evaluation of dual-target real-time polymerase chain reaction assays to detect Bordetella spp. Diagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Disease 61, 264272.
36.Lineamientos para la vigilancia epidemiológica de tos-ferina y síndrome coqueluchoide por laboratorio. InDRE. Available at http://www.gob.mx/cms/uploads/attachment/file/23793/Lineamientos_para_la_vigilancia_epidemiologica_de_tosferina_y_sindrome_coqueluchoide.pdf (Accessed 27 February 2018).

Keywords

Emerging of ptxP3 lineage in Bordetella pertussis strains circulating in a population in northeastern Mexico

  • J. L. Gutiérrez-Ferman (a1), L. Villarreal-Treviño (a2), J. M. Ramírez-Aranda (a3), A. Camacho-Ortiz (a4), M. R. Ballesteros-Elizondo (a5), M. R. Moreno-Juárez (a5), S. Mendoza-Olazarán (a1), M. E. de la O Cavazos (a5), J. Z. Villarreal-Pérez (a6), M. A. Gómez-Govea (a2) and E. Garza-González (a1)...

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed