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Effect of respiratory syncytial virus infection on binding of Neisseria meningitidis and Haemophilus influenzae type b to a human epithelial cell line (HEp-2)

  • M. W. Raza (a1), M. M. Ogilvie (a1), C. C. Blackwell (a1), J. Stewart (a1), R. A. Elton (a2) and D. M. Weir...

Summary

It has been suggested that individuals might be more readily colonized with bacteria that cause meningitis through enhanced binding of the bacteria to virusinfected epithelial cells. As respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) affects infants and children in the age group also susceptible to bacterial meningitis, we tested the hypothesis that infection of HEp-2 cells by RSV might enhance binding of Neisseria meningitidis or Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib). Attachment of fluorescein-labelled bacteria to HEp-2 cells was measured by flow cytometry, and RSV-infected cells bound significantly more meningococci (P < 0·001) and Hib (P < 0·01) than uninfected cells. Although the isolates expressed different antigenic characteristics (3 meningococci and 5 Hib), all showed a similar pattern of binding. The results are discussed with reference to the methods used for detection of bacterial binding and to interactions that might explain the increased binding to RSV-infected cells.

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      Effect of respiratory syncytial virus infection on binding of Neisseria meningitidis and Haemophilus influenzae type b to a human epithelial cell line (HEp-2)
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      Effect of respiratory syncytial virus infection on binding of Neisseria meningitidis and Haemophilus influenzae type b to a human epithelial cell line (HEp-2)
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      Effect of respiratory syncytial virus infection on binding of Neisseria meningitidis and Haemophilus influenzae type b to a human epithelial cell line (HEp-2)
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References

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