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The East Jakarta Project: surveillance for highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N1) and seasonal influenza viruses in patients seeking care for respiratory disease, Jakarta, Indonesia, October 2011–September 2012

  • A. D. STORMS (a1) (a2), R. KUSRIASTUTI (a3), S. MISRIYAH (a3), C. Y. PRAPTININGSIH (a4), M. AMALYA (a4), K. E. LAFOND (a1), G. SAMAAN (a4), R. TRIADA (a3), A. D. IULIANO (a1), M. ESTER (a4), R. SIDJABAT (a3), K. CHITTENDEN (a5), R. VOGEL (a6), M. A. WIDDOWSON (a1), F. MAHONEY (a1) and T. M. UYEKI (a1)...

Summary

Indonesia has reported the most human infections with highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) A(H5N1) virus worldwide. We implemented enhanced surveillance in four outpatient clinics and six hospitals for HPAI H5N1 and seasonal influenza viruses in East Jakarta district to assess the public health impact of influenza in Indonesia. Epidemiological and clinical data were collected from outpatients with influenza-like illness (ILI) and hospitalized patients with severe acute respiratory infection (SARI); respiratory specimens were obtained for influenza testing by real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. During October 2011–September 2012, 1131/3278 specimens from ILI cases (34·5%) and 276/1787 specimens from SARI cases (15·4%) tested positive for seasonal influenza viruses. The prevalence of influenza virus infections was highest during December–May and the proportion testing positive was 76% for ILI and 36% for SARI during their respective weeks of peak activity. No HPAI H5N1 virus infections were identified, including hundreds of ILI and SARI patients with recent poultry exposures, whereas seasonal influenza was an important contributor to acute respiratory disease in East Jakarta. Overall, 668 (47%) of influenza viruses were influenza B, 384 (27%) were A(H1N1)pdm09, and 359 (25%) were H3. While additional data over multiple years are needed, our findings suggest that seasonal influenza prevention efforts, including influenza vaccination, should target the months preceding the rainy season.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Author for correspondence: T. M. Uyeki, MD, MPH, MPP,Influenza Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,1600 Clifton Rd., NE, MS A-20, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. (Email: tuyeki@cdc.gov)

References

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Keywords

The East Jakarta Project: surveillance for highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N1) and seasonal influenza viruses in patients seeking care for respiratory disease, Jakarta, Indonesia, October 2011–September 2012

  • A. D. STORMS (a1) (a2), R. KUSRIASTUTI (a3), S. MISRIYAH (a3), C. Y. PRAPTININGSIH (a4), M. AMALYA (a4), K. E. LAFOND (a1), G. SAMAAN (a4), R. TRIADA (a3), A. D. IULIANO (a1), M. ESTER (a4), R. SIDJABAT (a3), K. CHITTENDEN (a5), R. VOGEL (a6), M. A. WIDDOWSON (a1), F. MAHONEY (a1) and T. M. UYEKI (a1)...

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