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The distribution of the DHFR genes in trimethoprim-resistant urinary tract isolates from Taiwan

  • Lin-Li Chang (a1), Shui-Feng Chang (a1), Teh-Yuan Chow (a2), Wen-Jeng Wu (a3) and Jong-Chou Chang (a4)...

Summary

Between July 1987 and June 1989, 1054 urinary isolates of enterobacteria from Kaohsiung, Taiwan were studied for their trimethoprim resistance. Trimethoprim resistance was defined as MIC greater than 4 μg/ml and high-level resistance by MIC greater than 1000 μg/ml. The incidence of trimethoprim resistance increased from 33·6% in 1987 to 42·1% in 1989. Among the resistant strains studied, 90% were resistant to high levels of trimethoprim. An increase in the proportion of resistant strains (33·9–46·3%) exhibiting high-level non-transferable trimethoprim resistance was noted. The distribution of the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) genes by colony hybridization in 374 trimethoprim-resistant isolates revealed the presence of type I and type V DHFR genes in most of these isolates (45·4% and 10·4% respectively). Type I was predominant in Escherichia coli whereas type V was frequently seen in Enterobacter spp. None showed homology with the type II and type III DHFR probe DNA. In addition, transposon Tn7 was present in 7·8% of 374 trimethoprim-resistant enterobacteria.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Requests for reprints to: Dr Shui-Feng Chang, Department of Microbiology, Kaohsiung Medical College, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan, Republic of China.

References

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