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Distribution of emm genotypes among group A streptococcus isolates from patients with severe invasive streptococcal infections in Japan, 2001–2005

  • T. IKEBE (a1), K. HIRASAWA (a2), R. SUZUKI (a3), H. OHYA (a3), J. ISOBE (a4), D. TANAKA (a4), C. KATSUKAWA (a5), R. KAWAHARA (a5), M. TOMITA (a6), K. OGATA (a7), M. ENDOH (a8), R. OKUNO (a8), Y. TADA (a9), N. OKABE (a9), H. WATANABE (a1) and the Working Group for Beta-haemolytic Streptococci in Japan...

Summary

We surveyed emm genotypes of group A streptococcus (GAS) isolates from patients with severe invasive streptococcal infections during 2001–2005 and compared their prevalence with that of the preceding 5 years. Genotype emm1 remained dominant throughout 2001 to 2005, but the frequency rate of this type decreased compared with the earlier period. Various other emm types have appeared in recent years indicating alterations in the prevalent strains causing severe invasive streptococcal infections. The cover of the new 26-valent GAS vaccine fell from 93·5% for genotypes of isolates from 1996–2000 to 81·8% in 2001–2005.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr H. Watanabe, Department of Bacteriology, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, 1-23-1 Toyama, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 162-8640, Japan. (Email: haruwata@nih.go.jp)

Footnotes

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†Other group members are listed in the Appendix.

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References

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1. Hortsmann, RD, et al. Antiphagocytic activity of streptococcal M protein: selective binding of complement control protein factor H. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 1988; 85: 16571661.
2. Fischetti, VA. Streptococcal M protein: molecular design and biological behavior. Clinical Microbiology Reviews 1989; 2: 285300.
3. Beall, B, Facklam, R, Thompson, T. Sequencing emm-specific PCR products for routine and accurate typing of group A streptococci. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 1996; 34: 953958.
4. Shimizu, Y, et al. Case report of toxic shock-like syndrome due to group A streptococcal infection [in Japanese]. Kansenshogaku Zasshi 1993; 67: 236239.
5. Ikebe, T, et al. Changing prevalent T serotypes and emm genotypes of Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome (TSLS) patients in Japan. Epidemiology and Infection 2003; 130: 569572.
6. Working Group on Severe Streptococcal Infections. Defining the group A streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. Journal of the American Medical Association 1993; 269: 390391.
7. McNeil, SA, et al. Safety and immunogenicity of 26-valent group A Streptococcus vaccine in healthy adult volunteers. Clinical Infectious Diseases 2005; 41: 11141122.

Distribution of emm genotypes among group A streptococcus isolates from patients with severe invasive streptococcal infections in Japan, 2001–2005

  • T. IKEBE (a1), K. HIRASAWA (a2), R. SUZUKI (a3), H. OHYA (a3), J. ISOBE (a4), D. TANAKA (a4), C. KATSUKAWA (a5), R. KAWAHARA (a5), M. TOMITA (a6), K. OGATA (a7), M. ENDOH (a8), R. OKUNO (a8), Y. TADA (a9), N. OKABE (a9), H. WATANABE (a1) and the Working Group for Beta-haemolytic Streptococci in Japan...

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