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Disease burden of post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome in The Netherlands

  • J. A. HAAGSMA (a1) (a2), P. D. SIERSEMA (a3), N. J. DE WIT (a4) and A. H. HAVELAAR (a1) (a5)

Summary

Post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS) has been established as a sequel of infectious intestinal disease (IID). The aim of this study was to estimate the burden of PI-IBS caused by the pathogens Campylobacter, Salmonella and Shigella, and to compare this with other outcomes associated with these pathogens. The attributable risk of PI-IBS due to bacterial pathogens was calculated and linked to national data on gastroenteritis incidence and measures for severity and duration of illness in order to estimate the burden of PI-IBS. One year post-infection, IBS developed in 9% of patients with bacterial IID. The burden of PI-IBS adds over 2300 disability adjusted life years to the total annual disease burden for the selected pathogens. PI-IBS is a frequent sequel of IID, resulting in a considerable disease burden compared to other outcomes. If this relationship is not considered, this will result in an underestimation of the disease burden of IID.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: J. A. Haagsma, M.Sc., National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Centre for Infectious Disease Control, Laboratory for Zoonoses and Environmental Microbiology, P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven, The Netherlands. (Email: j.haagsma@erasmusmc.nl)

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Keywords

Disease burden of post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome in The Netherlands

  • J. A. HAAGSMA (a1) (a2), P. D. SIERSEMA (a3), N. J. DE WIT (a4) and A. H. HAVELAAR (a1) (a5)

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