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A cross-sectional study of acute diarrhea in Pudong, Shanghai, China: prevalence, risk factors, and healthcare-seeking practices

  • J.-X. YU (a1) (a2), W.-P. ZHU (a3), C.-C. YE (a3) (a4), C.-Y. XUE (a3) (a4), S.-J. LAI (a2), H.-L. ZHANG (a2), Z.-K. ZHANG (a2) (a5), Q.-B. GENG (a2) (a6), W.-Z. YANG (a2), Q. SUN (a3) and Z.-J. LI (a2)...

Summary

Diarrhea is a common cause of morbidity and mortality and the incidence of diarrhea in the world has changed little over the past four decades. To assess the prevalence of and healthcare practices for diarrhea, a cross-sectional study was conducted in Pudong, Shanghai, China. In October 2014, a total of 5324 community residents were interviewed. Respondents were asked if they had experienced diarrhea (defined as ⩾3 passages of watery, loose, bloody, or mucoid stools within a 24-h period) in the previous month prior to the interview. The monthly prevalence of diarrhea was 4·1% (95% CI: 3·3–4·8), corresponding to an incidence rate of 0·54 episodes per person-year. The proportion of individuals with diarrhea who sought healthcare was 21·2% (95% CI: 13·4–29·0). Diarrhea continues to impose a considerable burden on the community and healthcare system in Pudong. Young age and travel were identified as predictors of increased diarrhea occurrence.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Z. Li, Division of Infectious Disease, Key Laboratory of Surveillance and Early-warning on Infectious Disease, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Changbai Rd. 155#, Changping Dist., Beijing 102206, China. (E-mail: lizhongjiecdc@163.com)

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These authors contributed equally to this work.

Name of department(s) and institution(s) to which the work should be attributed: Shanghai Pudong New Area Center for Disease Control and Prevention

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References

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Epidemiology & Infection
  • ISSN: 0950-2688
  • EISSN: 1469-4409
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