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Correlates of infection with Helicobacter pylori positive and negative cytotoxin-associated gene A phenotypes among Arab and Jewish residents of Jerusalem

  • K. Muhsen (a1), R. Sinnereich (a2), G. Beer-Davidson (a1), H. Nassar (a3), W. Abu Ahmed (a2), D. Cohen (a1) and J. D. Kark (a2)...

Abstract

We examined the prevalence and correlates of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection according to cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) phenotype, a main virulence antigen, among the ethnically diverse population groups of Jerusalem. A cross-sectional study was undertaken in Arab (N = 959) and Jewish (N = 692) adults, randomly selected from Israel's national population registry in age-sex and population strata. Sera were tested for H. pylori immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies. Positive samples were tested for virulence IgG antibodies to recombinant CagA protein, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Multinomial regression models were fitted to examine associations of sociodemographic factors with H. pylori phenotypes. H. pylori IgG antibody sero-prevalence was 83.3% (95% confidence interval (CI) 80.0%–85.5%) and 61.4% (95% CI 57.7%–65.0%) among Arabs and Jews, respectively. Among H. pylori positives, the respective CagA IgG antibody sero-positivity was 42.3% (95% CI 38.9%–45.8%) and 32.5% (95% CI 28.2%–37.1%). Among Jews, being born in the Former Soviet Union, the Middle East and North Africa, vs. Israel and the Americas, was positively associated with CagA sero-positivity. In both populations, sibship size was positively associated with both CagA positive and negative phenotypes; and education was inversely associated. In conclusion, CagA positive and negative infection had similar correlates, suggesting shared sources of these two H. pylori phenotypes.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence: Khitam Muhsen, E-mail: kmuhsen@tauex.tau.ac.il

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These authors contributed equally as senior authors.

Deceased.

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References

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Correlates of infection with Helicobacter pylori positive and negative cytotoxin-associated gene A phenotypes among Arab and Jewish residents of Jerusalem

  • K. Muhsen (a1), R. Sinnereich (a2), G. Beer-Davidson (a1), H. Nassar (a3), W. Abu Ahmed (a2), D. Cohen (a1) and J. D. Kark (a2)...

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