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Comparison of clinical characteristics of patients with Mycobacterium avium complex disease by gender

  • Y. Ikuyama (a1), A. Ushiki (a1), J. Akahane (a1), M. Kosaka (a1), Y. Kitaguchi (a1), K. Urushihata (a1), M. Yasuo (a1), H. Yamamoto (a1) and M. Hanaoka (a1)...

Abstract

The clinical characteristics of male patients with pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex disease have not been clearly defined. We aimed to clarify the clinical characteristics of male patients with pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex disease compared with female patients.

We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients with pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex disease who visited the outpatient clinic of the Shinshu University Hospital between 2003 and 2016 and compared the clinical characteristics of male and female patients.

A total of 234 patients with pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex disease were identified (68 men and 166 women). Male patients were significantly older than female patients. Blood examination results showed that the lymphocyte count, total protein level and albumin level were significantly lower in men than in women. Chest imaging findings were broadly categorised into the fibrocavitary and nodular bronchiectasis types. There were no significant differences in chest imaging findings and the time from diagnosis to disease exacerbation between men and women.

During the study period, the incidence of the nodular bronchiectasis type of pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex disease in male patients increased compared with previous reports. Men had no difference in time to exacerbation compared with women.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence: Atsuhito Ushiki, E-mail: atsuhito@shinshu-u.ac.jp

References

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Keywords

Comparison of clinical characteristics of patients with Mycobacterium avium complex disease by gender

  • Y. Ikuyama (a1), A. Ushiki (a1), J. Akahane (a1), M. Kosaka (a1), Y. Kitaguchi (a1), K. Urushihata (a1), M. Yasuo (a1), H. Yamamoto (a1) and M. Hanaoka (a1)...

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