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Comparing the epidemiology of hospital-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clone groups in Alberta, Canada

  • S. BRUZZESE (a1) (a2), K. BUSH (a1), J. LEAL (a1) (a3), J. KIM (a1), D. M. VICKERS (a1) (a3) (a4), A. RUSK (a1) (a3), S. FATHIMA (a5), V. LI (a5), L. CHUI (a5) (a6), M. LOUIE (a5) (a7) and E. HENDERSON (a1) (a3)...

Summary

Patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clones, which were traditionally seen in the community setting (USA400/CMRSA7 and USA300/CMRSA10), are often identified as hospital-acquired (HA) infections using Infection Prevention and Control (IPC) surveillance definitions. This study examined the demographics and healthcare risk factors of patients with HA-MRSA to help understand if community MRSA clones are from a source internal or external to the hospital setting. Despite USA300/CMRSA10 being the predominant clone in Alberta, hospital clones (USA100/CMRSA2) still dominated in the acute care setting. In the Alberta hospitalized population, patients with USA400/CMRSA7 and USA300/CMRSA10 clones were significantly younger, had fewer comorbidities, and a greater proportion had none or ambulatory care-only healthcare exposure. These findings suggest that there are two distinct populations of HA-MRSA patients, and the patients with USA400/CMRSA7 and USA300/CMRSA10 clones identified in hospital more greatly resemble patients affected by those clones in the community. It is possible that epidemiological assessment overidentifies HA acquisition of MRSA in patients unscreened for MRSA on admission to acute care.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Ms. K. Bush, Senior Surveillance Consultant, Foothills Medical Centre, South Tower 801, 1403-29 St NW, Calgary AB, T2N 2T9, Canada. (Email: kathryn.bush@ahs.ca )

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