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Comparative genomic fingerprinting of Campylobacter: application in routine public health surveillance and epidemiological investigations

  • E. SCHLEIHAUF (a1), S. MUTSCHALL (a2), B. BILLARD (a3), E. N. TABOADA (a2) and D. HALDANE (a4) (a5)...

Summary

A subtyping methodology for Campylobacter, Comparative Genomic Fingerprinting (CGF40), has been described recently. The objective of this study was to assess the utility of CGF40 as a tool to enhance routine public health surveillance of campylobacteriosis. Isolates of Campylobacter from across the province were requested and sent for CGF40 subtyping. Epidemiological data from cases reported to public health officials in Nova Scotia, Canada, from January 2012 to March 2015 were linked with blinded CGF40 subtyping results. CGF40 was epidemiologically valid; subtyping discerned known epidemiologically related isolates and augmented case-finding. Predominant sources and locations of subtype detection from the national reference database showed some study subtypes were rare and even novel to the database, while others were more commonly identified over multiple years and with exposures locally and internationally. A case-case study design was applied to examine risk factors for the most common CGF40 subtypes detected. Differences in the epidemiology of different CGF40 subtypes were observed. Statistically significant associations were noted for specific subtypes with rural residence, local exposure, contact with a pet dog or cat, contact with chickens, and drinking unpasteurized milk. With prospective use, CGF40 could potentially identify unrecognized outbreaks and contribute to epidemiological investigations of case clusters.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Ms. E. Schleihauf, 51 Garland Ave, Dartmouth, NS, B3B 0J2, Canada. (Email: emily.schleihauf@phac-aspc.gc.ca)

References

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Keywords

Comparative genomic fingerprinting of Campylobacter: application in routine public health surveillance and epidemiological investigations

  • E. SCHLEIHAUF (a1), S. MUTSCHALL (a2), B. BILLARD (a3), E. N. TABOADA (a2) and D. HALDANE (a4) (a5)...

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